Archive for May, 2012

Mother Grain: A Brief Intro to Quinoa

Thursday, May 31st, 2012
Quinoa and pine nuts, garlic, and raisins

Quinoa, pine nuts, and raisins

recipe available here

The new health food fad that’s taking the world by storm, quinoa, is a super grain grown primarily in Bolivia. Quinoa contains all eight amino acids essential for development of tissue, is gluten free, and packs more protein than any other grain. While researching foods beneficial to astronauts, NASA found quinoa unrivaled in its nutritional benefits. Grown by the Incas in South America, it was known as “mother grain,” and was used to feed Incan armies. Quinoa has been for many years a staple of the Bolivian diet, however in recent years it has been introduced to American and European markets.

Quinoa is prepared similarly to rice and takes only about 15 minutes to cook. It’s an excellent replacement for rice, bread, or couscous. It has a nutty flavor that works as a perfect side dish and delicious on its own. Quinoa is well suited for vegans, vegetarians, or anyone looking for foods that pack a nutritional punch. Additionally, quinoa flour can be used in baking as a gluten and wheat free alternative. For breakfast I like combining cooked quinoa, a dash of maple syrup, a bit of almond milk and fresh berries for a healthy and filling breakfast that holds me over well into lunch time.

quinoa plant

However despite all of its nutritional value, quinoa’s growing popularity has had negative effects on Bolivians. The export to America, Europe, and now Australia has resulted in higher prices of quinoa in Bolivia, making the growers of quinoa rich in the process. Those native to Bolivia can no longer afford the super food and are looking to cheaper processed grains that are lower in nutritional value leading to fear of malnutrition in an area that has long been affected by it. Additionally it’s view as a third rate rural food by centuries of agricultural imperialism by Spanish invaders has discouraged its local consumption.

 

Quinoa is a great food for experienced and novice cooks alike looking to add something new to their pantries. Because it’s so easy to make, it’s perfect for exploring new recipes.

 

Catherine, Hudson County Community College, Read my blog

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Roti Canai: Delicious Malaysian Finger Food

Wednesday, May 30th, 2012

It was a rainy Sunday morning in August when my friend took me and two other friends visiting from Washington DC to Curry Leaves Restaurant a Malaysian restaurant in Queens. I had but one request, “I’m hung-over, make it good.” Upon arrival to the Main Street station in Flushing, my friend, a native of DC, asked sardonically “Are we still in New York?” It’s easy to get confused, most if not all signs are in foreign languages. I assured my friend that we were indeed still in New York, albeit in one of its more distinct neighborhoods. We walked a few blocks away from the station to the small and cozy restaurant, where the  staff greeted us with enthusiastic smiles and welcoming service.

image credit: http://www.hungryferret.com/

We sat down and ordered the Malaysian Roti Canai as an appetizer. Roti Canai is an Indian-influenced flatbread dish eaten in Malaysia and Indonesia. The roti itself is considered street food, much like bagels or pretzels are eaten in New York City. Served with a bowl of strong and savory chicken curry, we were all enamored with the dish. Trying desperately to make time stand still, we ate as slowly as possible, relishing each bite. In between bites, we sighed wistfully, knowing that soon the meal would end. Once we devoured the roti, a bittersweet craving set in. Finally, when our main courses came we decided to supplement them with even more roti canai. I found it a great companion to the spicy fried noodles I ordered. The portions were huge and at around $10 a platter, it felt like highway robbery. Filled to the brim halfway through the meal, I still managed to fit in one more bite of roti.

If you can’t make it out to Flushing for some delicious Roti Canai, maybe you can try some of the cuisine that inspired it at Curry Kitchen:

 

Catherine, Hudson County Community College, Read my blog

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The Best Shows on Basic Cable

Tuesday, May 29th, 2012

With so many premium cable channels available today, such as Shotime, HBO and Starz, it can be hard to find shows on basic cable that are actually worth watching.  However, networks such as AMC and FX are still managing to air fantastic shows that are just as entertaining as shows on premium cable channels.  Below are a few shows on basic cable that are definitely worth checking out.

 

Breaking Bad

Breaking Bad, which airs on AMC, is essentially the portrayal of a man whose life is turned completely upside-down due to his involvement with cooking crystal meth.  The show is currently in between its 4th and 5th season and will only be 5 seasons in total.  Breaking bad is a fantastic drama/thriller series that would definitely be enjoyable for a mature audience.

The Walking Dead

The Walking Dead, which also runs on AMC, is widely considered the best TV show about zombies to date.  With that being said, there aren’t an overwhelming amount of zombie shows flooding the networks.  However, The Walking Dead is about more than just zombies.  The show has tremendous character and plot development, as well as fantastic makeup and set design.  Due to the content and general nature of the show, The Walking Dead is recommended for a mature audience.

It’s Always Sunny in Philadelphia

It’s Always Sunny in Philadelphia is not a new show by any means, however, it has somehow managed to fly under the radar of many comedy lovers.  The show, which airs on FX, is virtually plotless from episode to episode.  Each episode has its own topic that is covered in its entirety throughout the episode.  Other than a few character relationships, the show rarely tends to carry any baggage, so the series is pretty easy to get into.   Although it is a comedy series, a lot of the jokes are raunchy, so I would recommend this series to a more mature audience.

 

 

 

Michael Turzilli, Quinnnipiac University

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The Post-College Quiet

Friday, May 25th, 2012

What happens when you go from a life that is nonstop with stress and deadlines to a life that is slow paced and quite frankly, boring? Now that all of the excitement of graduating college has passed and life has returned to its normal level of excitement (or un-excitement), it is slowly beginning to sink in that this is life when you’re not in college, when you’re in the ‘real world’.

When there are no plans and everyone is busy with their own lives and you’re away from your college friends, you suddenly find yourself asking, “Is this it? Is this what life after college is really going to be like?”

If you’re someone who has plans to go to grad school in the fall, then don’t fret. Your boredom is only temporary. But if you’re someone like me who chose to hold off on grad school for a while and enter the work force, then you might feel a little discouraged by the increasingly sparse job market for recent grads.

The several weeks after college are similar to the five stages of grief.

First, there’s denial. I literally could not believe I graduated college. It seemed a long time coming and it shocked me that this was finally it.

Second and third are anger and bargaining as the humdrum of daily routines began to set in. I would have given a kidney to be working on a project for a class instead of being so bored.I read, did some job hunting, went out with friends and nothing seemed to fill the void where my daily routines often took me from six in the morning until two in the morning the following day.

The fourth stage of grief (and graduating college apparently) is depression. For a few days, I was just sad. I realized that it really was the end to a huge part of my life. And the final stage is acceptance. Acceptance of the loss of my college self and the welcoming the new person who will come into the ‘real world’ ready to take on a career.

Graduating college is a in a lot of ways like losing someone you love. College often times makes you the person you might be for the rest of your life. It has a huge impact on the way you think because most students are entering their twenties by the time they finish college.

But it doesn’t have to be all boring. The few months after college should be reserved for some fun, unless you’re lucky and already have a job lined up for after graduation. In the mean time, print out the coupon below for some coffee while you look for that golden opportunity job and check out The Campus Clipper for other great student discounts.

Janet Reyes, College of Saint Elizabeth 2012

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An Introduction

Wednesday, May 23rd, 2012

Traveling is one of my biggest passions in life. I think this habit started from a journey my mother took me to Malaysia when I was two-years-old. I cannot remember exactly how I felt the first time traveling abroad, but according to my mother I learned to use the bathroom instead of relying on diapers. Judging from that the trip must have went extremely well. Every now and then I travel with family, friends, and sometimes alone.

My name is Holly Chiu and I am a student at New York University studying economics and metropolitan studies. I was born in Taipei, Taiwan and lived there for the first fifteen years of my life. Then I moved to Bangkok, Thailand where I completed my high school education. I stayed in London for my freshmen year of college and now I have been in New York for two years. I always look out for opportunities to travel when I have a chance. I have planned trips with friends and family and they all went successfully. One of the biggest challenge for student traveling I encounter is budgeting.  Enjoying your time abroad without having to drop stacks of cash has become my goal while traveling.

Aside from traveling I am also a huge fan of food. You can say that my family lives to eat. Back home, my mother always said that cereal with milk is too cold for the stomach in the morning and a meal without soup is considered incomplete. Living three thousand miles away from home it’s sometimes difficult to have the same diet as before. Of course it is not difficult to find tasty food in a global city like New York, but I always feel accomplished when I cook for myself.

Here on the Campus Clipper blog I will be blogging about the secrets behind budget traveling and student cooking. Stay tuned, there’s lots of interesting postings coming up!

Holly Chiu, New York University

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Getting the Most out of Social Media

Wednesday, May 23rd, 2012

With countless sources of social media at your fingertips, it is hard to decipher just exactly what each website should be used for.  The first name that comes to mind when social media is considered is, of course, Facebook.  Facebook is a fantastic way to communicate with your friends, as well as promote yourself as an individual.  However, with other websites such as Tumblr and Twitter available, it has become difficult to choose when to use which type of social media.  This post will attempt to guide you to the proper social media outlet for whatever your needs may be.

Perhaps the largest use for social media is to update friends with current activities; if this is your ultimate goal with social media, Twitter is most likely for you.  Twitter’s clean layout is perfect for quick updates from your friends, or ‘followers’ as Twitter labels them.  Your Twitter page is essentially a listing of your friends’ most recent “Tweets.”  This layout works perfectly for individuals who use social media on the go, as updates from your friends will be no longer than 140 characters.  Due to the 140 character limit imposed by the creators of Twitter, Twitter is a great social media website for individuals who are consistently pressed for time.  The following is an example of a Twitter homepage layout

While Twitter is best for quick, on the go use, Tumblr serves as a social media site for just the opposite.  Although Tumblr can most certainly be used on the go, or when pressed for time, it is mainly composed of images selected by the owner of the Tumblr page.  Creating a Tumblr consists of posting pictures of things that strike your interest.

 

Furthermore, Tumblr can be used to share your pictures with people who may have overlapping interests.  Many people choose to post original photos, while some Tumblr users post stock images.  Either way, sharing images through Tumblr is a great way to get involved with social media.

Finally, we’re left with the largest social media website of them all, Facebook.  Facebook is a fantastic social media site, mostly due to its size and versatility.  While Twitter and Tumblr focus on either text or image based posts, Facebook has been successful in integrating both into one user friendly layout.  Moreover, Facebook also offers an instant messaging service called Facebook Messenger.  With these three elements combined, Facebook is able to stand out as the most crucial social networking website.

Whichever social media website you decide to register with, or combination of websites for that matter, make sure to consider the aforementioned.

Michael Turzilli, Quinnnipiac University

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Existential Anguish: Longing for the Past in Woody Allen’s Midnight in Paris

Wednesday, May 23rd, 2012

In Woody Allen’s Midnight in Paris, Owen Wilson rubs shoulders with the likes of F. Scott Fitzgerald and Ernest Hemingway, all while musing about man’s dissatisfaction with his place in time. Though viewers may consider such existential crises standard Allen fare, Owen’s turn as the deep, insecure writer departs from his usual role as the still insecure yet shallow bachelor. He broods, he vacillates, he jokes drily. We know its Allen who’s doing the talking, but with Wilson as the mouth it comes off lighter and more optimistic than usual.

Wilson’s Gil Pender is a Hollywood screenwriter and closeted novelist on vacation in Paris with fiancée Inez (Wedding Crashers costar and love interest Rachel McAdams) and her parents. As Inez and her wealthy parents live the high life at upscale restaurants, Gil feels an itching to go off and wander the streets of Paris, which he claims is most beautiful in the rain. This is trademark Allen—during an interview, he once mentioned that London’s rainy weather best suited his personality.

Gil in Rain

 

But with Gil, we see something more than Allen’s trademark melancholy. We see romanticism, the same kind that brings the fictitious Tom Baxter to life in Allen’s Purple Rose of Cairo. As with the main character in that film, though, we see the ridiculousness of Gil’s romantic notions. How else but by sheer absurdity could Gil find himself pulled into a 1920s cab one night and transported to the world of Fitzgerald, Gertrude Stein, and Hemingway?

Gil, who has been nursing his novel for years without letting anyone read it, brings it to the house of Gertrude Stein where he meets Pablo Picasso’s charming young mistress Adriana (Marion Cotillard). Though Inez can’t understand why Gil centers his novel on an antiquities shop filled with what she no doubt considers worthless junk, Adriana feels drawn to Gil and his pining for the past. As Gil returns night after night to 1920s Paris to continue seeing Adriana while meeting other notables like Dali (Adrien Brody) and the surrealists, Inez is secretly having an affair with Paul (Michael Sheen), her friend’s pedantic husband. Like Gil, we don’t want this pleasant dream to end. Like Gil, we know it must.

Looking at Allen’s work as a whole, it can be difficult to separate the man from the comic persona. He’s mastered the art of studied dissatisfaction, of not getting too excited because you know you’ll just spoil it later—or something will do it for you. As contrived as that might be, you can’t help but think that it has some basis in the real Allen, though maybe film is just his way of rising above the melancholy.

Midnight in Paris isn’t necessarily a happy movie, but it is an optimistic one. Gil has to let go of a few notions by the end of the movie, and his trip to France’s belle époque with Adriana reveals the impossibility of trying to be completely happy with the age  you were born in. However, Gil’s statement near the end of the movie is the most telling: in the same way that we long to escape our present by looking to the past, future generations may look to our own era as the best of times. Does this mean we should be happy living in our  time? Probably not. Allen revels in half-unhappiness, so it would be too much to say he’s telling us that things are fine. But we can’t let our longing for the past stop us living and advancing. We too will be longed for someday. Years from now, when person-to-person communication has become all but obsolete, our phones will sit inside antique shop windows, and passersby will stop and say, “How quaint those people were, at that time. How charming it all was!

Andres Oliver, Emory University
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An Introduction

Tuesday, May 22nd, 2012

I grew up in Jamaica Queens. My apartment building was sandwiched between a bodega and a pupuseria. For the unexposed, a bodega is a deli grocery store typically owned and operated by Dominicans with heavily accented English. You know a corner store is a bodega if when you walk in there’s an employee holding a newspaper leaning against a food stand or ice cream freezer speaking with the man behind the counter in rapid fire Dominican Spanish smattered with at least fifteen diques and babosos per second. A pupuseria is a Salvadorian restaurant that specializes in pupusas- a thick tortilla stuffed with any combination of pork, cheese, and beans. My mom used to pick up a fifteen pack of pupusas revueltas (mixed) every weekend for dinner. On the weekdays after school I’d search for quarters in the sofa and go to the bodega for a ring pop. Growing up in New York City I was constantly exposed to different people and cultures. Being a kid, I was never aware of the privilege that is exclusive to those who are raised in big cities. I had classmates and friends from all around the world and I experienced their cultures through food. For immigrants from any country, food can be the most important tie to home. I realized this about myself when I lived in El Salvador for three months. Sure, the local riguas, pupusas, and pasteles were great but after the first month, all I really wanted was a cheeseburger or a turkey sub.

I love food and I’m incredibly un-picky about my tastes. I’m an adventurous person and I explore with my stomach as much as I do with any other part of my body. Fried spicy Malaysian noodles with squid? Serve me a platter. Pasteles stuffed with cheese and guava? That sounds interesting- I’ll take two. This place has a C on the front door? Who cares? The Cuban sandwiches are great, salmonella be damned. To me, eating food and participating in the ritual of consumption is the funnest, cheapest, and most delightfully exciting way to experience culture. That’s why I’ll be blogging about finding great authentic ethnic food in New York City, as well as creating some dishes at home. My name is Catherine and I’ll be your guide through the best the five boroughs has to offer.

Catherine, Hudson County Community College, Read my blog

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A Few Words of Introduction

Monday, May 21st, 2012

My dad has always been a big film buff. You could say that’s been passed down, definitely in my upbringing, though possibly genetically as well. I watched Disney when I was younger just like any other kid, but then there were the others–Cinema Paradiso, Zorba the Greek, basically the complete works of Jack Lemmon–not your standard childhood viewing. Back then I’d start protesting as soon as he put in the VHS and I noticed that the movie was in black and white. This was a sure sign of heavy themes and thought-provoking commentary on the human condition.  What kind of kid wants to have to think when he’s watching a movie? But years later, I look back on those grainy black and white films and I know beyond a shadow of a doubt that they’re the reason I don’t spend weekends watching Michael Bay movies. I think I would have liked cinema regardless of my upbringing, but I’ve got my dad to thank for having some semblance of taste.

Did I introduce myself? My name is Andres Oliver. I’m a 21-year-old student at Emory University majoring in creative writing and Japanese, and this summer I’ll be doing movie reviews for The Campus Clipper. This means my film likes and dislikes will be out there for the world to read, discuss, and quite possibly debate hotly over dinner, creating new friends of enemies and tearing families apart. Ok, I’ll tone it down. I love movies, but this is the first time I’ve been given free rein to comment upon them in a public space, so forgive me if I get a little carried away. Some of my favorite films include Blade Runner, Once Upon a Time in the West, The Lord of the Rings trilogy, and Sleuth. I’ll be covering recent films as well as some of the older ones that might not be as familiar to college students. There’s a lot of material to pick out–race relations, gender portrayals, violence and profanity–and I’ll be doing the picking. Look forward to a summer’s worth of material

Andres Oliver, Emory University
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Staying Entertained Without Emptying your Wallet

Wednesday, May 16th, 2012

Staying Entertained Without Emptying your Wallet

Trying to steer away from boredom is a task that we all face almost every day.  With summer around the corner, students will likely become bored very quickly without the excitement of being at college.  To keep yourself entertained is often an easy task. However, it usually requires spending a lot of money.  Seeing as how money is generally tight for students nowadays, here are some low budget ways to keep yourself entertained:

1) Take up cooking as a hobby!
This is a particularly cheap way to spend your time due to the fact that the money you spend to cook is also the money used for your food.  The process of cooking can be very exciting, especially if you find yourself to be a good cook.  Be adventurous at the supermarket and get creative; this will lead to more intricate meals that are more fun to cook and more delicious to eat!

2) Start Blogging
Blogging is a fantastic way to kill time if you are the type of person who likes to share stories.  Creating a blog will allow you to express your daily life through the internet.  Most blog hosting websites are free, such as WordPress or Blogspot, so blogging will actually cost you nothing.

3) Borrow Movies, Rather Than Seeing Them in Theatres
Movie ticket prices have gotten so expensive that complaining about the price has become almost cliche.  With the average ticket price around $12.50, students are often forced to stay at home instead of seeing new movies.  The simple solution for this is to borrow movies from your friends.  Although you may have to wait a few months to see the movie, you will be saving yourself a ton of money, and will be able to watch the movie at your own pace.

These three tips should serve as useful to many college students this summer.  For more savings, check out the following coupons:

 

 

Michael Turzilli, Quinnipiac University
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