Archive for the ‘onShopping’ Category

Fashion Is Meant To Be Disposable

Monday, August 11th, 2014

Gasp! If you’re really into fashion, I know how that sounds. Fashion is art and art is sacred, and this is sounding like an oxymoron?

Well, we are on the subject of modernity and if modernity is the inherent fiber that makes the American urban young-adult aesthetic as commercially successful and as cultural relevant as it is then fashion must be predisposed to imitating its nature, one that mutates and evolves. Which is why fashion is meant to be disposable—it’s meant to be functional and it’s meant to be aware of itself.

You have your  fashion staples, pieces that never go out of fashion, timeless pieces passed down from generations that remain profoundly embedded in the vision of every contemporary class of fashion makers and influencers since its time. We can cite Diane Von Furstenberg’s wrap dress as one of those revolutionary pieces that easily made themselves permanent fixtures of American fashion and are now deservedly iconic. Combining a minimalist design with equal parts high functionality and artistic direction is genius that transcends both time and culture. You can now walk into most fashion retail department stores around the U.S and see a wrap dress on display and it won’t feel retrospective or vintage. The prints, the colors, the textures even, will be as modern as our time but the design remains essentially classic.

Or we may look at a simpler paradigm…

American blue jeans, who doesn’t own a pair? This garment probably holds the same importance to the mediated image of American fashion as Bourbon whiskey does for American leisure. The key seemingly is a formulaic dose of design and function. A pair of denim trousers as an innovation at its time was simply a reaction to the social shift in the workplace. No longer did textile need to be spun at home by hand while adhering to dress etiquettes of propriety and decorum. Because of the much dirtier nature of  factory work and because of available means to mass produce, a new industrial population demanded more casual, more utilitarian fashion, in effect more disposable fashion— cheap practical simple design—fashion that was not in essence concerned  with art but with a primary objective of being wearable.

Inevitably, all fashion ends up reflecting on its approximate culture being bred from the intellectual and material resources of that culture. All design as a general rule takes a creative direction. But the more disposable fashion becomes, the less we see a creative direction in lieu of wear-ability and the more adaptable it is to our own creative expression. Fashion as a disposable commodity responds to the modernity of culture, our need for self-expression, our need for high functionality paralleled to the high-paced structures of our lives, and our endless appetite for consumption and instant gratification. Ideally, fashion has to be obsolete and we want it to be. When constantly seeking ‘the new’ and ‘the modern’, we don’t get that without recycling ‘the old’ to generate new ideas.

So we must go back to modernity and also understanding the instrumental role of fashion being functional for use and disposable for value. We may thus understand why the American aesthetic is ideal to be at the forefront of fashion globally—why people in all corners of the world aspire to the white tee and blue jeans, perfectly bracketed within urban young adult imagery, the most important shaper of culture

 

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Margael St Juste, Hunter College ’15

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The Fashion Complex You’re a Part of

Monday, August 11th, 2014

This blog series is a serialized look at fashion as a function and inspiration in our everyday lives. It explores the urban young-adult aesthetic in modern American culture, specifically in New York City. If you are reading this series, you’re somewhat familiar with urban fashion trends or perhaps you fit the aforementioned demographic. The urban young-adult aesthetic likely saturates every form of media from music to films and other visual arts that you consume. You find that a touch of it lingers in the background track of your favorite dance song when you hear heavy platform shoes on hardwood floors or the clink of metal on some over accessorized clubgoer. You notice that the film adaptation of your favorite young-adult series uses the popular color scheme from the runway that year. It is no coincidence that fashion concepts marketed to young-adults are such popular motifs in other art forms. The young adult is powerful in any form of art. The confluence of their unique and modern generational experience fused with newfound independent thinking, without fail, makes every generation of young adults the most important shapers of culture.

The term aesthetic generally conflates a vast concept of beauty and the perception of it through the senses. In fashion, it has a more direct association to the word style, the concept of self-identifying through clothes. Often it’s used to describe a brand or fashion house’s distinct personality.  That is what I mean when I talk of the urban young-adult aesthetic. I’m talking about the distinct ‘isms’ of this generation that are engaged in formulating this seamless urban attitude that is both commercially successful and culturally relevant.

Once we learn to recognize this phenomenon as part of our cultural affect, we can start to understand it—why the urban young adult is a universal landmark of aspiration on the runway and subsequently in our local fashion department stores. Firstly, being young is always en vogue. The fashion industry’s obsession with youth is another story altogether but it is important here to note since it’s all, believe me, very cyclical. What the urban young adult means to fashion however is newness and modernity. Fashion that adapts to us has the key to being successful.  Modernity, a tried and true American ‘ism’, allows for adaptability to changing times and markets. This series outlines five inherent concepts of the urban young-adult aesthetic that exemplify how it works and works so well.

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Margael St Juste, Hunter College ’15

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A Look Inside Vada Spa and College Discounts for Students

Tuesday, September 3rd, 2013

First-time-spa-user here. I’m not really one to make a big fuss over nothing, even crazy college savings,  but I have to say– there are certain things you must try in life, and one of them is getting a professional massage. This is a level of pampering that will absolutely erase your bad day, and the Vada Spa employees go well out of their ways to make sure you leave feeling like royalty. I want to take a minute and describe my trip to you.

Vada Spa, located in downtown Manhattan, is committed to excellent service that is affordable and accessible to anyone. It has two floors: the nail salon on ground level and the hair salon and spa upstairs. When I walked in to make the appointment, I was greeted warmly at the front desk, and was even offered a glass of wine to sip on while I waited for massage. (I mean how classy is that? That’s what I mean when I say they go the extra mile.) I decided I’d get a manicure before my appointment, so I picked out a pale pink Essie color and took a seat at table right away. The woman who did my nails was extremely thorough when she was prepping them, and very neat with the polish itself. I learned that all of Vada Spa’s employees all had at least five years of experience before coming there, and anyone who’s ever gotten a messy manicure knows that this really makes a huge difference.

When I was finished drying my nails, it was time to get my massage. My masseuse came to meet me at the front desk. He introduced himself as Tibor and then escorted me to the spa on the second level. It looked as though there were about four or five separate massage rooms on this floor. My room was dimly lit as if by candlelight, and there was soft music playing in the background; it was easy to get comfortable there. The massage itself was one of the most relaxing experiences I’ve ever had, both mentally and physically. It’s funny how you have no idea how tense your muscles are until someone works out all the knots. I’d had backrubs before just from friends, but this is on a completely different level. By the end of it I was so relaxed that I didn’t want to get up– I couldn’t believe an hour had gone by!

This is one experience I’d like to repeat. Those of you who’ve had massages before, you know exactly what I mean! Those who haven’t? Well, you’ll just have to take a trip to Vada Spa!

Check out this college discount before going!

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Laura DeFrancisci, Manhattan College. Check out my Blog!

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Interested in more deals for students? Sign up for our bi-weekly newsletter to get the latest in student discounts and promotions  and follow our Tumblr and Pinterest. For savings on-the-go, download our printable coupon e-book!

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Friends of Campus Clipper: SocialEyes NYC

Monday, August 19th, 2013

Even living in the exciting atmosphere New York, sometimes I get bored. Which is crazy! What a city to be bored in! Sometimes I just need a little inspiration, or maybe a nudge in the right direction. SocialEyes NYC  is a great blog to give you that nudge.

socialeyesnyc.com

First you can pick by area, in case you don’t want to stray too far from your home, or if you’re feeling adventurous and want to explore a certain neighborhood. Or, you can select from museum deals, concerts, or even sporting events. No matter your interests, SocialEyes NYC is your blog for fun, affordable outings.

My favorite of the current events: classic film screenings at Bow-Tie Cinemas. Tickets are only $7.50 and they’re showing movies like The Goonies, Casablanca, Psycho, and The Birds. Another great idea to get in on is the presale for the New York Comedy Festival. This is a huge event each year, with a ton of fun comedians and groups coming to town, so hitting up the presale is a must.

Let SocialEyes NYC help you search for your next fun night in the city!

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Erin O’Brien, NYU.

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Interested in more deals for students? Sign up for our bi-weekly newsletter to get the latest in student discounts and promotions  and follow our Tumblr and Pinterest. For savings on-the-go, download our printable coupon e-book!

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Friends of Campus Clipper: The Hang

Monday, August 19th, 2013

The Hang has a very similar approach to Campus Clipper, which is why we’re proud to consider them our partners in fun. Run by college students, The Hang is a guide to all student discounted events in NYC and the surrounding area.

Some fun events The Hang has pointed us to are Free Fridays at the Museum of Moving Image in Astoria, and free admission to the MoMA on Friday evenings.

For the older college students, there’s a list of NYC party events that are 21+, each offering free or discounted tickets on certain days of the week.

The Hang also offers a long list of retail stores that offer great student discounts.

So hang out! Do your thing! Because with The Hang, fun is affordable to every student.

thehangny.com

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Erin O’Brien, NYU.

Follow the Campus Clipper on Twitter and Like us on Facebook!

Interested in more deals for students? Sign up for our bi-weekly newsletter to get the latest in student discounts and promotions  and follow our Tumblr and Pinterest. For savings on-the-go, download our printable coupon e-book!

 

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Friends of Campus Clipper: Blick

Monday, August 19th, 2013

Dick Blick Art Materials, or, as it is more simply known, “Blick,” is an art supply store and a friend of Campus Clipper. Blick offers a whole array of art supplies as well as supplies for crafts and framing.

Currently, Blick is offering a Back to School sale running until October 6th that includes little things like brushes, as well as more expensive items like canvases.  You’ll also find coupons for 40% off framing. Not only that, but they’re also running a car sweepstakes!

My favorite part of Blick is probably that their products range from real artists’ art necessities—supplies for sculpture, drawing, and illustration—to craft supplies and services anybody can use, like screen printing, framing, yarn, and beads for crafts. Blick is easily the most accessible and friendly art store you’ll find here in the city.

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Erin O’Brien, NYU.

Follow the Campus Clipper on Twitter and Like us on Facebook!

Interested in more deals for students? Sign up for our bi-weekly newsletter to get the latest in student discounts and promotions  and follow our Tumblr and Pinterest. For savings on-the-go, download our printable coupon e-book!

 

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New You– Summer ‘Do

Saturday, July 27th, 2013

Ready for an updated look? There’s no better time than now! Listen, New York gets hot in the summer. The kind of hot where it feels like we’re forever alternating between sticky heat waves and solid weeks of rain; not the best recipe for a good hair day, I know. My hair is thick and curly, which in summer months best translates to massive and frizzy. I’m used to wearing my hair up in a bun almost all the time over the summer, and it’s less because of the heat than because my hair just gets unmanageable.  I was determined to fight back this year, and so I looked into upscale hair salons hoping that there would be some difference between the fancier places and my usual local ones. What I wound up trying was Salon Ziba, downtown by NYU. I want to talk a little about my experience there. (Spoiler Alert: great haircut, great people, great price, happy Laura.)

I walked in and immediately felt that this salon was out of my normal price range: chic and modern where my old place was more drab and uninspired. But I spoke a little bit with the owner, Alonso, and he explained to me that the salon’s goal is to deliver high-end, profession haircuts and styling for an affordable price. Alonso told me that his inspiration came partially from his own haircuts 25 years ago before Ziba opened. He said that he was very happy with how they looked and the great care that he received, but also that he was annoyed at having to pay up to $75 for a trim. When he started Salon Ziba at its first location in midtown, he kept this in mind and aimed to keep the prices low without sacrificing quality. As a low-income college student, I was particularly excited to hear this news.

The employees treated me like a princess. They offered me tea or coffee as they walked me to the back to get my hair washed. When it came time to pick a cut, my stylist asked me what I wanted and had his own advice about what I should do. (I’m on a mission to grow my hair out long, so what I really wanted was a look that would not only frame my face nicely at its current length, but also look just as good in a year.) What he recommended was that I angle it more at the front since my face is almond shaped, and that I try a center part for a more fierce look than my old side part. After I let him do his thing, he asked me if a wanted a blow-out. This is a first for me! My stylist was really nice and he showed me just what he was doing so I could try it at home.

Five days later on a humid day, curls are still intact.

I walked out of the salon that day feeling beautiful and renewed. They all gave me a lot of attention and good advice to help my hair grow faster. And the best part? The whole thing, wash cut and style, cost me $48. That only about $10 more than I pay for just a haircut at the place I used to go to. Guess I have a new regular hair salon!

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Laura DeFrancisci, Manhattan College. Check out my Blog!

Follow the Campus Clipper on Twitter and Like us on Facebook!

Interested in more deals for students? Sign up for our bi-weekly newsletter to get the latest in student discounts and promotions  and follow our Tumblr and Pinterest. For savings on-the-go, download our printable coupon e-book!

 

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College Savings Doesn’t Mean College Boredom

Thursday, August 30th, 2012

Being broke is not fun. Your friends are out having the time of your lives and you’re stuck at home due to lack of funds. Although a night out on the town doesn’t need to cost much, you can only get so far with a wallet full of hopes and dreams. With that being said, here are a couple of tips to help turn you into the thrifty man or woman you always knew you could be . . . I’m talking borderline parsimonious.

Saving and budgeting doesn’t just factor into one aspect of your life—it should greatly affect ALL aspects. College savings are important because you are on your own and you want to prove that you can live on your own. Managing your money is the first step to being able to do what you want when you want.

Transportation tends to be one of the biggest expenses in the city. Whether because of gas prices or MetroCards, a large amount of our money goes into getting from place to place. How can this be cut down? Skateboarding, rollerblading, and biking have gotten quite popular. Commuter cycling has doubled since 2005, and there are bike sharing programs around the city whose memberships are substantially cheaper than a monthly MetroCard.  Carpooling to class can be a great way to not only make friends but save money, and, if all else fails, you can walk.

Thrift stores are more popular than they have ever been.  Places such as the Salvation Army and Goodwill can provide you with basic t-shirts and jeans as low as $2. Venture to the nook and crannies of some of Manhattan’s shopping districts and you’re bound to find a Buffalo Exchange or a Beacon’s Closet. These thrift stores sell name brand clothing for ridiculously cheap prices. If you’re a fan of vintage styles and trendy clothing then these stores are for you.

Cheap dates are usually the next thing on your mind since you have the ability to actually make it and the clothes to step out in. Magazines such as <em>The L Magazine</em> and <em>Village Voice</em> are always advertising free movie screening and shows. MyFreeConcert.com is one of my favorite websites for not only concerts but also art exhibits and fun (and, more importantly, free) nights out.

After running around the city you’ve probably worked up quite the appetite. Luckily, the Campus Clipper is here to help. We offer deals across the city, helping students keep the green in their pockets while taming the growling in their stomachs. The $9.99 all-you-can-eat lunch buffet at Bombay Talkie is highly suggested, or if you and a friend need a caffeine boost, there’s a coupon for a free cappuccino or latte with a purchase from The Bean.

So there you have it: proof that you can have fun in the big city and keep a majority of your cash at the same time! Now go out, have fun and be frugal.

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Carlos L., Monroe College. Read my blog!!  Follow me on Twitter and Facebook :)

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Interested in more deals for students? Sign up for our bi-weekly newsletter to get the latest in student discounts and promotions  and follow our Tumblr and Pinterest. For savings on-the-go, download our printable coupon e-book.

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If it Ain’t Broke, Why Go Broke Buying A New One?

Sunday, April 29th, 2012

I’m a person who eats, lives and breathes all things creative. Okay, maybe not eat because that’d be a bit odd but you get my point.
One of my creative indulgences has always been photography. Cameras, particularly the type I like to work with, aren’t exactly cheap. I currently own a Nikon D-60, which by 2012’s standards would be considered outdated. What are they up to now, the Nikon 25,000?
I’m joking of course, but Nikon has added a ton of new models to their line up since I first got my little D-60 about four years ago.

The little Nikon that could.

If you’re like me and enjoy the arts and photography in particular, you know that sometimes there is a need to keep up with the changing technology in photography, only if you’re a total tech head.

But if you indulge in the simple pleasure of creating art with a camera, there are tons of ways to tickle your every photographic whim while sticking to that college budget.

First, don’t go selling your car just to buy the latest camera model. You know for a fact that in another six months or so, the company is just going to release yet another, fancier version of the ‘latest’ model so don’t waste your money; it’ll only lead to heartbreak.

Instead of spending the money you originally planned on using to buy that new model, spend the money on pimping out the camera you currently have. For example, instead of buying a new camera for my little D-60, I instead opted to upgrade my lens. Now, my pictures are just as great as those that are taken with a D-5,000.

A new lens enhanced the quality of my photos for way less than the price of a new camera.

Another great way to further your endeavors in photography is to shop around vintage stores for old film cameras. If you have any knowledge of darkroom photography, this can be a great way to take your photography to the next level. In today’s tech savvy world, it’s rare to come across a photographer who actually knows how to work with film.

However, if you have no prior knowledge of film photography but have the time and patience to learn a new skill, buying a cheap, used film camera and learning on your own doesn’t hurt.
And what do you do if find yourself with a broken camera and face the temptation of filing for bankruptcy just to buy a fancy new camera?

Fix it! It’s way less expensive to fix a used camera then to buy a whole new one. However, if you truly want to buy a new camera, at least go through less expensive sellers like Ebay or Amazon rather than big name stores where they jack up the prices.

To save a bit of money getting that broken camera fixed, be sure to use this student discount and look for other student discounts when purchasing any electronic items. Remember, it never hurts to ask!

Janet, College of Saint Elizabeth, 2012

Follow me on twitter! Check out my blog!

Click here  to download the Campus Clipper iTunes App!

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Interested in more deals for students? Sign up for our bi-weekly newsletter to get the latest in student discounts and promotions. For savings on-the-go, download our printable coupon e-book!

 

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Sale savvy

Friday, March 16th, 2012

I travel around 34th street a lot, mostly because of the many stores I can go through. I notice there are a lot of stores that say “sample sale” or “wholesale only”. Which brings me to the question: what is the difference between a whole sale and a sample sale?

Now, while these are no-brainers to many people, for the longest time I was completely unfamiliar with these terms.

Going into one of these stores, you see a small amount of several items along with tags on each. Some items are wrapped together in a plastic covering, others are hanging separately on a beam against the wall. There is no music and the place over all feels slightly dingy but gives you the sense that you might find a deal here.

Wholesale is when stores buy large quantities of items from manufacturers and sells it in smaller bulks to retail stores. This is mainly used for smaller retail stores to get good quality items for cheap. If you go to shop here and don’t plan to buy in bulk, you should probably go elsewhere. However, some stores will sell individual pieces. Chances are though if it says “only wholesale” don’t bother.

Claim what is rightfully yours!

Sample sale legally means:

“Any sample or model which is made part of the basis of the bargain creates an express warranty that the whole of the goods shall conform to the sample or model”. [UCC § 2-313(c)]

It used to be a term for when designers would sell pieces from their collection to show at retail stores at the end of a season. For the public, these items would sold at wholesale prices and would be limited in selection. However, now it has turned into more of a stock sale, where left over inventory is given to stores while being sold at a fraction of the price. Generally, there is only one type of size and they only take cash.

For a third type of sale (just to keep boggling your mind) there are warehouse sales. Recently, American Apparel had a warehouse sale, selling their items at crazy discounts. The main difference is that the items being sold are usually items that have been on the shelves and this event is similar to a final clearance. They usually, but not always, take credit or debit.

There has been an online movement for sample sales where there might be some membership authorization involved. Overall, the selection is less and items go very quick.

How to find one of these sales? Online you can do a search or if you know a friend/ family  member in the field who can clue you in. Some places you can subscribe to them to get emails of events.

As for shopping at a sample sale there are some helpful tips here: http://www.thebudgetfashionista.com/archive/sample-sale-shopping-tips/.

For those of you want more savings on clothing, here is a student discount for Hillary Boutiques.

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