Archive for the ‘Cheap Eats’ Category

From New York to….Paris

Wednesday, July 5th, 2017

Paris is known for a lot of things…the lights, the romance, those little Eiffel Towel trinkets, but nothing compares to the food. From the most delicately prepared escargot to the finely aged wine and cheese, the French know food…though that’s not to say New Yorkers don’t.

http://therealwinejulia.com/

http://therealwinejulia.com/

https://www.sandaya.fr/

https://www.sandaya.fr/

So, how does a perfect night of food in Paris compare to one in New York? Usually I just give you tips on how to tackle a variety of issues in New York and another city with the hopes that if you like New York for one reason, you’ll fall head over heals in that other city for the same reaosn. But since food is close to my heart, I’ve instead listed two “perfect” nights of food for you to fall in love with, one for the city of love and one for the city that never sleeps. I hope one day you’ll get to compare the two:

A Night in Paris

So you’ve found a way to Paris and experienced the romance of kissing at its center and walking alone the Seine and now you’re hungry. Do I have a night for you. The credit for most of this goes to NYU London’s Tony Skitt, but I’ve made a few modifications from personal experience. An aperitif is a dry alcoholic drink taken before dinner. A kir is a traditional French aperitif and some of the best can be found at Chez Georges (get there early, it opens at 6pm but it’s hard to get just kir when this place gets crowded) on the rue des Canettes in the Latin Quarter. Then for your main meal try Chez Fernand around the corner. Now that you’re stuffed, you have to get dessert. The Île de Saint-Louis behind Notre Dame (quite the sight at night) boasts to have the best ice cream in the world. For this you have two options: Berthillion ice cream, which claim to be the best, or my personal favorite, La Brasserie de l’Isle Saint-Louis. It’s not an ice cream place, but their chocolate ice cream is amazing nonetheless—and if Chez Fernand left you wanting, the escargot is pretty good too. From here you could do one of two things. One option is going to a jazz club called Caveau de la Huchette (on rue de la Huchette) which is the place for swing dancing in Paris and a way to dance off all those carbs (the place really starts picking up at 11pm). Another is to buy a nice bottle of Parisian wine and a a box of chocolate (or if you’re a broke college kid, like me, a cheap bottle of wine and the smallest box of Lindt chocolate you can find) and sit by the river across from the Eiffel Tower. There’s a small parking lot directly across from the tower along Port Debilly that has steps leading down to the river that provides the most stunning view.

Ice cream at La Brasserie de l'Isle Saint-Louis. Taken by Jainita Patel

Ice cream at La Brasserie de l’Isle Saint-Louis. Taken by Jainita Patel

La Brasserie de l'Isle Saint-Louis. Taken by Jainita Patel

La Brasserie de l’Isle Saint-Louis. Taken by Jainita Patel

View from across the river. Taken by Jainita Patel

View from across the river. Taken by Jainita Patel

 

A Night in New York

Paris is beautiful and expensive and charming, but nothing says food and fun like a night out in New York City. Not only does New York have the ability to provide a fun and stunning night, but the diversity in New York is also one of its biggest assets. In place of an aperitif to get the appetite stirring, I suggest getting your stomach grumbling by stopping at La Churreria in Nolita sometime in the late afternoon. This place has the best hot churros and chocolate I’ve ever had. It’s a small venue, but cheap and delicious. Now for the entrée. Where to even begin? Well, since we’re all trying to save, I would recommend Momofuku Noodle Bar or Superiority Burger if you’re starving. Both are cheap eats that will fill you up. If you’re saving for dessert, you can save with left overs and what college kid doesn’t love leftovers? Another option is also HandCraft Kitchen and Cocktails, which the Campus Clipper intern team recently visited and has some of the most unique dishes I’ve ever had. For dessert, a lot of places will claim that they’re the best, but me, a stranger on the internet, is telling you definitively that Veniero’s in the East Village is the best. It’s right next to Momofuku, so you might need to go for a walk before you come back here, but it has the best Italian pastries and gelato I’ve ever had. Even Eataly doesn’t come close (when it comes to dessert I mean). It’s open until 1am so you’ll have plenty of time. After (or maybe before) dessert, there are a few things you can do to digest. You can go dancing or drinking in some of the fun venues I’ve mentioned before, or you can take a pastry to go and sit in East River Park to see the lit up Empire State Building to the left and Brooklyn straight ahead.

 

Handcraft Kitchen and Cocktails http://gitr.com/wp-content/

Handcraft Kitchen and Cocktails
http://gitr.com/wp-content/

The best place in the world. http://media.yellowbot.com/

The best place in the world.
http://media.yellowbot.com/

There you have it. Two foodie adventures in two amazing cities. And who knows? If you like New York or Paris mainly because of its food, maybe one day you’ll get a chance to visit the other.

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By Jainita Patel

Jainita is a Campus Clipper publishing intern who is double majoring in English and Environmental Studies at NYU. Though writing fiction and painting are her two main passions, she also has a love of travel and adventure that has taken her across the globe.  Jainita writes under the pseudonym Jordan C. Rider. If you like her posts, you can find more of her work here or follow her on Twitter. For over 20 years, the Campus Clipper has been offering awesome student discounts in NYC,  from the East Side to Greenwich Village. Along with inspiration, the company offers students a special coupon booklet and the Official Student Guide, which encourage them to discover new places in the city and save money on food, clothing and services.  

At the Campus Clipper, not only do we help our interns learn new skills, make money, and create wonderful e-books, we give them a platform to teach others. Check our website for more student savings and watch our YouTube video showing off some of New York City’s finest students during the Welcome Week of 2015. 

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From New York to…Stockholm

Wednesday, June 21st, 2017

It’s hard not to feel fed up in a city. Your apartment has roaches the size of rats, you step in a mysterious liquid almost every day, and the F train is late again. Worst of all, people seem to be everywhere when you don’t want to be near them, but nowhere when you need them. The isolation is a lot to handle.

New York’s not the only city in the world that can make you feel isolated. Stockholm, in its cold, distant beauty is also like this in that it can be a fairly lonely city, even after you’ve lived there for a while.

But maybe isolation isn’t such a bad thing—think of it as solitude instead. For one, you have friends, but you just don’t want to be around them at the moment and that’s okay. Everyone feels this way at one point or another in New York and in Stockholm and here are a few ways to spend your time in solitude to get you loving your city again:

https://cdn.vox-cdn.com/

https://cdn.vox-cdn.com/

https://c1.staticflickr.com/

https://c1.staticflickr.com/

 

Be Productive.

I’m not joking. Without the need to be around friends to distract you, you can get a lot of work done. Though the sight of people isn’t great when you want to be alone, a quiet coffee shop might help you stay focused. In Stockholm, a good place to do this might be in Gamla Stan’s Chokladkoppen, or if you’re not in the mood to deal with the tourists of Gamla Stan, maybe just go to your local Espresso House instead. In New York, finding a quiet coffee shop is can require quite the hike. If you’re up for it, the Little Chair in Two Bridges is worth the journey. Or maybe just stick to a Think Coffee in the Village. Either way, a coffee shop is a great way to be productive and get away from most people you know.

 

Treat Yourself.

Not in the mood to see anyone? Great! This is the perfect time to take a page out of Tom Haverford and Donna Meagle’s book: Treat yourself. New York and Stockholm are both great cities to do so. Need a new work outfit? Treat yourself. Want to dye your hair? Treat yourself. Want that thousand calorie dessert? No one’s there to judge you. Treat. Your. Self. Even so, sometimes you want to treat yourself without breaking the bank and the Campus Clipper has great deals for gelato places like Unico or relaxing spas like the Lilac Spa on 1st Ave. In NYC, when you want to go shopping, you go to 5th Ave. In Stockholm, you go to Södermalm where you can find anything from desserts at Casja Warg to unique clothes at Beyond Retro.

 

Scenic Self-Reflection.

So every time you want to go see something cool outside of Gamla Stan or Soho, your friends are always there to bog you down. Well, now’s the time for your vision journey. It’s time to leave your neighborhood and go see the sights of your beautiful city. In Stockholm, why not take an archipelago tour and see the breathtaking islands that surround Stockholm (bring a jacket) or go to the Moderna Museet and see that exhibition you’ve been wanting to check out? In New York, go up to Inwood and to view the Hudson from the Cloister’s Museum or head to the Brooklyn or Bronx Botanical Gardens. These places are great to take a step back and think while you’re alone.

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View from the Cloisters https://s-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com/

View from the Cloisters
https://s-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com/

 

The archipelago. Taken by Jainita Patel.

The archipelago.
Taken by Jainita Patel.

Do that One Thing You’ve Been Putting Off.

What’s the one thing you’ve wanted to do or have been meaning to do and just never got around to it? Is it nerding out at Science Fiction Bokhandlen in Gamla Stan or wandering the Strand for hours? Is it going to a certain museum or to see a certain site? Is it taking an MMA Bootcamp class at Nimble Fitness (coupon in the Campus Clipper)? Well now’s your shot. Do it.

The Strand. https://i1.wp.com/

The Strand.
https://i1.wp.com/

 

Gamla Stan. Taken by Jainita Patel.

Gamla Stan.
Taken by Jainita Patel.

Cities can be a pain when you’re feeling a little alone, but there’s always a way to embrace it and make the most of the amazing place you live in. Whether it’s Stockholm or New York, being alone sometimes can be beneficial to your mental health and give you a moment to reflect. And who knows? If you like the idea of exploring NYC or Stockholm alone, maybe you’ll get to explore the other city some day as well.

__________________________________________________________________________________

By Jainita Patel

Jainita is a Campus Clipper publishing intern who is double majoring in English and Environmental Studies at NYU. Though writing fiction and painting are her two main passions, she also has a love of travel and adventure that has taken her across the globe.  Jainita writes under the pseudonym Jordan C. Rider. If you like her posts, you can find more of her work here or follow her on Twitter. For over 20 years, the Campus Clipper has been offering awesome student discounts in NYC,  from the East Side to Greenwich Village. Along with inspiration, the company offers students a special coupon booklet and the Official Student Guide, which encourage them to discover new places in the city and save money on food, clothing and services.  

At the Campus Clipper, not only do we help our interns learn new skills, make money, and create wonderful e-books, we give them a platform to teach others. Check our website for more student savings and watch our YouTube video showing off some of New York City’s finest students during the Welcome Week of 2015. 

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Make Your Own Sushi: Sushi For The Festive

Saturday, April 1st, 2017
Image Credit: https://www.japancentre.com/en/recipes/1369-flower-shaped-sushi-roll

Image Credit: https://www.japancentre.com/en/recipes/1369-flower-shaped-sushi-roll

One of the great things about sushi is that it often has many colorful ingredients, and this can make it a beautiful and festive dish. Making sushi like this is a little more difficult than the previous recipes, but the added effort makes the presentation positively gorgeous!

To start, we’ll begin like we would with a standard roll of sushi. Tear a strip off your sheet of seaweed, then spread the rice over it, as usual. The ingredients will be wrapped in seaweed this time, to add a nice decorative effect (you’ll need two sheets of seaweed for this recipe). We’ll be making a design of a flower, so you’ll want a few differently colored ingredients. For this recipe, we’ll use crab meat (or imitation crab meat), carrot, and avocado; however, since this recipe is based on color and presentation, feel free to deviate from it and use any other colorful ingredients you like!

Spread the seasoned rice on the first sheet of seaweed, leaving, as always, a border on both the top and bottom edges. Wrap each of the ingredient strips with strips of the second sheet of seaweed, then line one strip of crab meat and one strip of carrot on top of the rice. Leave a little space between them, then lay the avocado strip on top of the other ingredients. Pull the seaweed layer to the edge of the bamboo mat with your thumb and forefinger, and begin to roll it together. Before you finish rolling, however, lay the remaining strip of crab meat and the strip of carrot on top of the avocado, and hold in place with your other three fingers. Carefully roll the rest of the sushi together, and gently press together. When you cut the sushi open, you should end up with a simple flower shape in each piece of sushi. Arrange the sushi on a dish and dazzle your friends!


This is the tenth and final chapter from an e-book by one of the Campus Clipper’s former publishing interns, who wrote about how to make sushi. Follow our blog for more chapters from this e-book. We have the most talented interns ever and we’re so proud of them! For over 20 years, the Campus Clipper has been offering awesome student discounts in NYC,  from the East Side to Greenwich Village. Along with inspiration, the company offers students a special coupon booklet and the Official Student Guide, which encourage them to discover new places in the city and save money on food, clothing and services.  

At the Campus Clipper, not only do we help our interns learn new skills, make money, and create wonderful e-books, we give them a platform to teach others. Check our website for more student savings and watch our YouTube video showing off some of New York City’s finest students during the Welcome Week of 2015.

Become a fan on Facebook and follow us on Twitter and Instagram

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Make Your Own Sushi: Sushi on a Budget

Saturday, March 25th, 2017
Image Credit: http://fruitguys.com/almanac/2011/05/05/roll-your-own-how-to-make-vegetarian-sushi

Image Credit: http://fruitguys.com/almanac/2011/05/05/roll-your-own-how-to-make-vegetarian-sushi

Although sushi is simple and delicious, it sometimes requires ingredients that can be a little on the expensive side. Luckily, there are alternative, less expensive ingredients that can be used to make sushi that is equally delicious!

Of course, buying in bulk is also a great way to save money on sushi ingredients. Japanese sushi rice is generally sold in bulk quantities, so this can help you save as well. Once you make the rice, you can even freeze it in a plastic bag to save to use another time; it will stay fresh in the freezer. This will also help you save time later on if you are in a rush to cook! Sushi rice is usually inexpensive when bought in bulk; however, quinoa can also be used as a substitute ingredient if you can find some that’s less expensive at a local grocery! It is a little harder to roll because it does not have quite the same sticky texture as sushi rice, but with a little extra care, it certainly can be done!

Somewhat like the Japanese immigrants did when they substituted avocado for salmon, we’ll be substituting sweet potato for any seafood. This ingredient has a somewhat similar texture, but sweet potatoes cost a lot less than fish, which certainly helps on a student budget. In addition to sweet potato, this recipe will use shiitake mushrooms. Most of the time, when this sushi is made it is seasoned with scallions; however, finely cut, cooked onions can be used as well. The sweet potato should also be cooked, then cut into thin strips.

Take a sheet of seaweed, then fold and tear off a two-inch strip. Spread a layer of rice (or quinoa) over the large sheet of seaweed, but remember to leave a border on the top and bottom edges. Fold the bottom edge of seaweed up over the rice layer, and lay the seaweed strip down. Line the sweet potato, shiitake mushrooms, and sliced onions on the seaweed, and bring the whole layer down to the edge of the bamboo mat. Roll the sushi together, cut into eighths, and enjoy!


This is the ninth chapter from an e-book by one of the Campus Clipper’s former publishing interns, who wrote about how to make sushi. Follow our blog for more chapters from this e-book. We have the most talented interns ever and we’re so proud of them! For over 20 years, the Campus Clipper has been offering awesome student discounts in NYC,  from the East Side to Greenwich Village. Along with inspiration, the company offers students a special coupon booklet and the Official Student Guide, which encourage them to discover new places in the city and save money on food, clothing and services.  

At the Campus Clipper, not only do we help our interns learn new skills, make money, and create wonderful e-books, we give them a platform to teach others. Check our website for more student savings and watch our YouTube video showing off some of New York City’s finest students during the Welcome Week of 2015.

Become a fan on Facebook and follow us on Twitter and Instagram

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Make Your Own Sushi: Sushi on a Picnic

Saturday, March 18th, 2017
Image Credit: https://elitefood.wordpress.com/tag/sushi/

Image Credit: https://elitefood.wordpress.com/tag/sushi/

When most people think of a picnic lunch, the first thing on their minds is not sushi. However, there are a lot of summer vegetables that make for delicious sushi ingredients, and since sushi is generally a small but filling meal, it’s easy to carry with you. This recipe will use ingredients that won’t spoil and are summery and delicious. If you’re still doubtful that your sushi will be fresh, though, you can always pack an icepack along with your sushi lunch!

For this recipe, we’ll be using green beans, zucchini, and dried shiitake mushrooms. There are plenty of other mushrooms that are delicious in the summertime, though, so feel free to substitute another type if you want a fresher sushi. Green beans and zucchini are great in the summer, and especially if you grow your own––green beans are super easy to take care of! These ingredients make a great and light summer meal that’s also filling.

As always, fold and tear a two inch strip off the seaweed. Spread a thinner layer of rice than usual over the seaweed, while leaving a border on both the top and bottom edges. This will make it a lighter meal; few people want a heavy meal in their stomachs during a hot summer! Cut your ingredients into strips—the zucchini in particular should be cooked first; the green beans can be left raw for an added crunch. Fold the bottom edge of seaweed on top of the rice layer, lay the seaweed strip down, then line up your ingredients along the piece of seaweed. Bring the whole layer down to the edge of the bamboo mat, and roll the sushi together. Cut into eighths, and pack in a lunchbox. For a nice snack, cherry tomatoes and snap peas will go along well with your healthy picnic lunch!


This is the eighth chapter from an e-book by one of the Campus Clipper’s former publishing interns, who wrote about how to make sushi. Follow our blog for more chapters from this e-book. We have the most talented interns ever and we’re so proud of them! For over 20 years, the Campus Clipper has been offering awesome student discounts in NYC,  from the East Side to Greenwich Village. Along with inspiration, the company offers students a special coupon booklet and the Official Student Guide, which encourage them to discover new places in the city and save money on food, clothing and services.  

At the Campus Clipper, not only do we help our interns learn new skills, make money, and create wonderful e-books, we give them a platform to teach others. Check our website for more student savings and watch our YouTube video showing off some of New York City’s finest students during the Welcome Week of 2015.

Become a fan on Facebook and follow us on Twitter and Instagram

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Make Your Own Sushi: Study Break Sushi

Saturday, March 11th, 2017
Image Credit: http://www.rawtillwhenever.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/09/vegan-tempura-sushi-2.png

Image Credit: http://www.rawtillwhenever.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/09/vegan-tempura-sushi-2.png

Generally, when I’ve been stuck in the library for a while, and I finally take a study break, it’s spent watching stupid youtube videos while eating junk food from the vending machine. Although that makes for an easy snack break, junk food is not such a great idea. After all, there are plenty of foods that are good for your mind and memory, and there’s no better time for a stimulating snack than on a study break! Several of these “brain foods” make for a great sushi recipe, so the next time you need a snack while you’re studying, try it out!

For this recipe we’ll be using brown rice and sushi rice mixed together, along with broccoli, eggplant, and asparagus. Brown rice provides vitamin B6, which has been linked to memory, cognition and brain health. Broccoli, too, has B6, as well as vitamin K, which is known to improve the health of brain cells. Eggplant contains nasunin, an antioxidant that is said to protect the lipids in brain cell membranes that maintain your brain’s health; and asparagus is a good source of folate, which is good for your brain and even reduces the risk of dementia later in life.

To start, fold and tear a two inch strip off the seaweed. Spread a layer of rice over the seaweed, while leaving a border on both the top and bottom edges. Fold the bottom edge of seaweed on top of the rice layer, lay the seaweed strip down, and line your ingredients up. Bring the whole layer down to the edge of the bamboo mat, and roll the sushi together. Cut into eighths, and enjoy!

For a drink that goes well with your study sushi, rather than having a soda, try some matcha green tea on the side! It’s delicious, and it has antioxidants and vitamins that are also good for your brain!


This is the seventh chapter from an e-book by one of the Campus Clipper’s former publishing interns, who wrote about how to make sushi. Follow our blog for more chapters from this e-book. We have the most talented interns ever and we’re so proud of them! For over 20 years, the Campus Clipper has been offering awesome student discounts in NYC,  from the East Side to Greenwich Village. Along with inspiration, the company offers students a special coupon booklet and the Official Student Guide, which encourage them to discover new places in the city and save money on food, clothing and services.  

At the Campus Clipper, not only do we help our interns learn new skills, make money, and create wonderful e-books, we give them a platform to teach others. Check our website for more student savings and watch our YouTube video showing off some of New York City’s finest students during the Welcome Week of 2015.

Become a fan on Facebook and follow us on Twitter and Instagram

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Make Your Own Sushi: Sushi for Vegetarians and Vegans

Saturday, March 4th, 2017
vegetarian-sushi-rolls.jpg.839x0_q71_crop-scale

Image Credit: https://www.fromthegrapevine.com/israeli-kitchen/recipes/vegetarian-sushi

Sushi is one of the easiest meals to adapt for vegetarian eaters, mainly because when you make it yourself, all ingredient choices are up to you, and sushi is tremendously variable with regard to ingredients. This recipe includes egg—if you’re vegan simply leave it out—as well as dried shiitake mushrooms and spinach leaves. For vegetarians and vegans who need to watch their protein intake (since animal products are an important source of protein), this recipe makes sure to use ingredients that have plenty of protein. Nori seaweed, shiitake mushrooms, and brown rice are good sources of protein; the mushroom also provides dietary fiber and iron. It’s a good idea to use half brown rice and half Japanese sushi rice, so that the rice stays sticky enough to roll easily.

The egg in this sushi is cooked like an omelet, but sweetened. Take an egg and beat it in a bowl––beating the egg thoroughly will help make sure the color is even. Add a pinch of salt and about ¼ teaspoon of sugar, and cook it in a pan, making sure to keep it as flat as possible. When it’s cooked, fold it and cut into strips. Cut the dried shiitake mushrooms into strips as well.

Once all your ingredients are prepared, fold and tear a two-inch strip off the sheet of seaweed. Now cover the seaweed with rice, leaving a border of about an inch on top and a half inch below. Fold the bottom border on top of the rice, and lay the seaweed strip on top of the rice. Line up your ingredients on the seaweed, and bring the whole layer to the edge of your bamboo mat. Hold the bamboo mat and seaweed with your thumb and forefinger, and, keeping the ingredients in place with the rest of your fingers, fold the seaweed and bamboo mat over the ingredients. Unroll the bamboo mat, bring the seaweed to the edge of the mat once more, and roll the sushi all together. Now simply cut the sushi into pieces about an inch long.

A great side dish to go with this sushi is miso soup with tofu. Tofu is a great source of protein, so this soup is the perfect side for anyone worried about protein intake!


This is the sixth chapter from an e-book by one of the Campus Clipper’s former publishing interns, who wrote about how to make sushi. Follow our blog for more chapters from this e-book. We have the most talented interns ever and we’re so proud of them! For over 20 years, the Campus Clipper has been offering awesome student discounts in NYC,  from the East Side to Greenwich Village. Along with inspiration, the company offers students a special coupon booklet and the Official Student Guide, which encourage them to discover new places in the city and save money on food, clothing and services.  

At the Campus Clipper, not only do we help our interns learn new skills, make money, and create wonderful e-books, we give them a platform to teach others. Check our website for more student savings and watch our YouTube video showing off some of New York City’s finest students during the Welcome Week of 2015.

Become a fan on Facebook and follow us on Twitter and Instagram

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Make Your Own Sushi: Sushi for the Health-Conscious

Saturday, February 25th, 2017
Image Credit: https://www.finedininglovers.com/recipes/appetizer/quinoa-sushi-rolls-salmon/

Image Credit: https://www.finedininglovers.com/recipes/appetizer/quinoa-sushi-rolls-salmon/

Sushi can be a very healthy meal. It’s simple; it’s not processed, and it’s packed with nutrients. Amie Valpone– culinary marketing consultant, nutritionist and author of www.TheHealthyApple.com– emphasizes the importance of clean eating like this for your health. When you eat sushi, you get plenty of nutrients without any unhealthy processing, or heavy butter and cream, making it a great choice for your body! Although we already did a salmon recipe, salmon is one of the healthiest kinds of fish to eat, and a classic sushi ingredient. This time, we’ll pair the salmon with broccoli and asparagus, for a simple and healthy sushi.

Many of the ingredients often found in sushi are incredibly healthy. Nori seaweed in particular has great health benefits; of all of the types of seaweed, it is one of the richest in protein and fiber. It also contains omega-3 fatty acids, as well as vitamin C and taurine, which can help your body maintain a healthy cholesterol level.

Take a sheet of seaweed, fold, and then tear off a strip of about two inches. Spread the rice over the sheet of seaweed, leaving a border of about an inch on top and a half-inch below. If you like, you can mix brown rice with the Japanese sushi rice. Brown rice is an important source of whole grains and minerals, and can even help protect against heart disease and type two diabetes. Mixing the two types of rice will give you the health benefits of the brown rice while staying sticky enough to roll easily. Fold the bottom border on top of the rice.

Now it’s time to line up the ingredients. Wild salmon in particular is full of nutrients and minerals such as selenium and omega-3 fatty acids, with low mercury content. Broccoli, in addition to being high in fiber, also contains plenty of vitamin C and folic acid. Asparagus is also a good source of folic acid, but it also provides almost an entire alphabet of vitamins––vitamins A, C, E, K, and even B6. Now bring the seaweed and rice layer to the edge of the bamboo mat, and begin to fold it over the ingredients. Once it’s folded, use a knife to cut with back and forth sawing motions, again to keep the sushi’s round shape.

Enjoy!


This is the fifth chapter from an e-book by one of the Campus Clipper’s former publishing interns, who wrote about how to make sushi. Follow our blog for more chapters from this e-book. We have the most talented interns ever and we’re so proud of them! For over 20 years, the Campus Clipper has been offering awesome student discounts in NYC,  from the East Side to Greenwich Village. Along with inspiration, the company offers students a special coupon booklet and the Official Student Guide, which encourage them to discover new places in the city and save money on food, clothing and services.  

At the Campus Clipper, not only do we help our interns learn new skills, make money, and create wonderful e-books, we give them a platform to teach others. Check our website for more student savings and watch our YouTube video showing off some of New York City’s finest students during the Welcome Week of 2015.

Become a fan on Facebook and follow us on Twitter and Instagram

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Make Your Own Sushi: Super Simple Sushi

Saturday, February 18th, 2017
Image credit: http://mediterrasian.com/blog/?p=76

Image credit: http://mediterrasian.com/blog/?p=76

As much as I love making beautiful sushi, the truth is that when preparing it at home, sometimes I don’t make it formally: as usual in cooking, there’s an easy way out. Temakizushi literally means ‘sushi rolled by hand’ in Japanese, and this is because you don’t use a bamboo mat to carefully roll the sushi together. You simply take a square of sushi in one hand (a fourth of the full sheet of seaweed), and spread the rice over it with a spoon with your other hand. Then lay whichever ingredients you want to throw together on top, roll it together in your hand, and eat! It’s as simple as that.

Although somewhat less satisfying to make than other types of sushi, mostly because it doesn’t look the same, Temakizushi is absolutely perfect for when you’re with a big group of people. Anyone who’s tried to order pizza for a roomful of people knows the horror of trying to compromise on food, and this way, everyone can make their own sushi to their individual taste. Vegetarians can leave out seafood, those who don’t like crab meat can go for salmon instead.

In my own family, temakizushi is an easy classic. It’s the meal my mom’s family in Japan had the first time my dad went to meet them. It’s the meal we had when I went to visit several years later, with my grandmother and cousins and aunt all squashed around the small table, and the one my cousins chose when they came to New York to visit, when we had three types of fish and vegetables of all sorts from which to choose. A dish like this brings people together; this way, everyone’s pleased.


This is the fourth chapter from an e-book by one of the Campus Clipper’s former publishing interns, who wrote about how to make sushi. Follow our blog for more chapters from this e-book. We have the most talented interns ever and we’re so proud of them! For over 20 years, the Campus Clipper has been offering awesome student discounts in NYC,  from the East Side to Greenwich Village. Along with inspiration, the company offers students a special coupon booklet and the Official Student Guide, which encourage them to discover new places in the city and save money on food, clothing and services.  

At the Campus Clipper, not only do we help our interns learn new skills, make money, and create wonderful e-books, we give them a platform to teach others. Check our website for more student savings and watch our YouTube video showing off some of New York City’s finest students during the Welcome Week of 2015.

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Make Your Own Sushi: Sushi For The Doubtful – California Roll

Saturday, February 11th, 2017
Image Credit: https://www.sushihaven.co.uk/california-roll.html

Image Credit: https://www.sushihaven.co.uk/california-roll.html

For those who are doubtful of trying new things, or even just of raw fish, California rolls are a great place to start, and to introduce your friends to sushi. In fact, they were originally made “inside out,” with rice on the outside, to make sushi more accessible to Americans. The most commonly used ingredients in California rolls are avocado, cucumber, and crab meat.

The first step is to cook the rice itself, then to season it with sushi rice vinegar. Cut your ingredients so that they’re ready for use. Gently tear the seaweed into halves. Place your bamboo mat in front of you, and lay a sheet of plastic wrap, roughly the size of the bamboo mat, on top. Lay a half sheet of seaweed on top of the plastic wrap and cover it entirely with a layer of rice. Sprinkle sesame seeds on the rice for extra decoration and taste.

Take another piece of plastic and lay it on top of the layer of rice, just to keep the rice from sticking to the bamboo mat. Flip the whole thing over, so that the seaweed is face up. Now peel the top layer of plastic off. Line up your ingredients in the center. Just like with the salmon roll, I’d recommend putting the avocado, the softest ingredient, in between the others; for example, surrounded by the crab meat and cucumber.

Now you’re ready to roll the sushi together! Just as you would with a standard roll of sushi, pull the seaweed back so it aligns with the edge of the bamboo mat, then hold the edge of the seaweed and the bamboo mat together with your thumb and index fingers. Holding the ingredients in place with your remaining three fingers, fold the seaweed layer over the ingredients and press down. Peel the bamboo mat back, realign the sushi, and finish rolling it together. Now unroll the bamboo mat, and gently tug the plastic wrap out from inside the sushi. Leaving the plastic on the outside of the sushi, roll the whole sushi again in the bamboo mat.

From here, simply cut your sushi. Because the sticky rice is on the outside, it’s easier to just cut the sushi through the outside plastic. Once you’re done cutting, pull the two edges of the sheet of plastic apart from each other and take the sushi out of the plastic layer. Enjoy!


This is the third chapter from an e-book by one of the Campus Clipper’s former publishing interns, who wrote about how to make sushi. Follow our blog for more chapters from this e-book. We have the most talented interns ever and we’re so proud of them! For over 20 years, the Campus Clipper has been offering awesome student discounts in NYC,  from the East Side to Greenwich Village. Along with inspiration, the company offers students a special coupon booklet and the Official Student Guide, which encourage them to discover new places in the city and save money on food, clothing and services.  

At the Campus Clipper, not only do we help our interns learn new skills, make money, and create wonderful e-books, we give them a platform to teach others. Check our website for more student savings and watch our YouTube video showing off some of New York City’s finest students during the Welcome Week of 2015.

Become a fan on Facebook and follow us on Twitter and Instagram

Share