Archive for the ‘onLife’ Category

Self-Love and Your Job

Friday, May 26th, 2017

“Never continue in a job you don’t enjoy.

If you’re happy in what you’re doing, you’ll like yourself, you’ll have inner peace.

And if you have that, along with physical health,

you will have had more success than you could possibly have imagined.”

-Johnny Carson

Johnny Carson-talk show host and comedian. Image Credit: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Johnny_Carson

Johnny Carson-talk show host and comedian. Image Credit: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Johnny_Carson

Self-love and your career. What an intriguing thought. How does what you do for a living impact the way you love yourself?

There are tons and tons of inspirational quotes on self-love and the career you lead! Take some time to check out a few of them! Definitely worth it! Image Credit: https://www.linkedin.com/topic/self-esteem

There are tons and tons of inspirational quotes on self-love and the career you lead! Take some time to check out a few of them! Definitely worth it! Image Credit: https://www.linkedin.com/topic/self-esteem

Well, are you doing what you’re doing because you love it, or because it is easy, convenient, or pays the bills? I think many of us, myself included, get caught in the ease and convenience of complacency in life. It is too easy to get comfortable wherever we are and not want to leave, to remain complacent because your job provides you with (maybe even just barely) financial stability. Personally though, I’ve always said that if I start to feel too comfortable, it is time to move on to something else-there’s no opportunity for growth where we are overly comfortable. We are simply stagnant here. This space is useless when it comes to personal growth.

An interesting thought is also that loving your job can actually impact your health. As is goes, if you love what you are doing, they say you’ll live longer! Inc. explains that happy equals healthy, good jobs fuel community, good work allows for fulfillment, enjoying your job means less stress and anxiety, and being challenged means less boredom.

No one wants to feel like this guy! Find what you love and do it the best you can! Relax and take a deep breath. Stop rushing and let go of any unnecessary stress, depression, or anxiety! Image Credit: https://www.inc.com/laura-garnett/5-reasons-loving-your-job-helps-you-live-longer.html

No one wants to feel like this guy! Find what you love and do it the best you can! Relax and take a deep breath. Stop rushing and let go of any unnecessary stress, depression, or anxiety! Image Credit: https://www.inc.com/laura-garnett/5-reasons-loving-your-job-helps-you-live-longer.html

Further explained…one study found that older people who are overall happier and in better moods are 35% less likely to die within five years, people who are more social live an average of 3.7 years longer than their less-social counterparts, psychologists say living with a purpose is the most important key to living a long and healthy life, stress is the top proxy killer disease today, and mental alertness keeps your brain sharp as you age.

To wrap that all up, a fruitful and fulfilling career will lead you straight to a place of greater self-love!! A job where you are enjoying your work, surrounding yourself with kindness and support, and being appreciated and respected will give you greater confidence and appreciation for yourself and what you are doing.

I believe that each of us, whether we want to admit it or not, truly desires to be successful and to do so by finding something that we love to do and thriving at it. How many people still say that there is no such thing as loving your job so much it feels like you never have to work a day in your life, though? Too many! Do you believe this? Share your comments on this with us! I truly believe that the idea of loving your career so that it is a fruitful and satisfying part of your life is an idea that is entirely possible to turn into a reality. Perhaps I am naive, but I really don’t think so.

You try it! If you hate your job, maybe it is time to move on to bigger and better places. If you love your job, think about how that relates to the way you feel about yourself. Are you happy? Would you be less happy with a less satisfying career? Probably. Love yourself and find a career that feeds your soul! You’ll only thank yourself.


By Chanelle Surphlis

Chanelle Surphlis is a Campus Clipper publishing intern, who is graduating from FIT this May. Passionate about giving back and pursuing volunteer opportunities, Chanelle aspires to work for a fashion or beauty company that includes philanthropy in its core values. If you like Chanelle’s writing, check out her blogs here and here. We have the most talented interns ever and we’re so proud of them! For over 20 years, the Campus Clipper has been offering awesome student discounts in NYC,  from the East Side to Greenwich Village. Along with inspiration, the company offers students a special coupon booklet and the Official Student Guide, which encourage them to discover new places in the city and save money on food, clothing and services.  

At the Campus Clipper, not only do we help our interns learn new skills, make money, and create wonderful e-books, we give them a platform to teach others. Check our website for more student savings and watch our YouTube video showing off some of New York City’s finest students during the Welcome Week of 2015. 

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The History Behind Self-Love

Tuesday, February 28th, 2017

love of self.

you belong to you

sometimes your soulmate

is yourself

and everything

you’ve been searching for

can be found

deep within your soul”

- R.H. Sin

 

Image Credit: http://life-happens.co.uk/self-love-podcast/

Image Credit: http://life-happens.co.uk/self-love-podcast/

It’s February, and love is in the air, but often times what people forget or completely overlook, is the idea of self-love and how important it is to love ourselves. Each one of us has something unique within us, something that is not to be wasted and without utilizing those unique and special qualities that make us individuals, we are, in fact, doing those around us a disservice. Maybe you’ve heard this before, but truly believing it and feeling it is crucial to our well-being.

The journey of self-love is one that has always sat in the back of my mind, but it has more recently come to the forefront to play a large role in my life. I was raised to be strong and independent, to work hard to achieve my goals and to obtain a life where I don’t have to, or even want to, rely on anyone else for anything, whether it be physical or emotional. This ideal has always played a huge part in my life, and it is probably why the ease of falling in love caught me off guard, yet why I also made decisions that were best for me even when I was in a relationship that I thought was bulletproof. Maybe this is a bit of an oxymoron, but I was so invested in my relationship, while also focusing on my own agenda, such as: doing well in school, studying abroad, and planning my upcoming job search and career. Naturally, when my three-year relationship came to an end against my will four months ago, I was at a complete loss.

I realized that while I always had the mentality of an independent, Chanelle and not Chanelle and her significant other, and that I could do anything I set my mind to, I had to actually feel this independence again and move forward as the dynamic of my life, my daily routine and emotional state, all changed. This felt like the most difficult obstacle I had ever needed to overcome, but it didn’t take me too long to realize that I am an array of amazing qualities and I do not need to be accepted or loved by anyone who does not appreciate all of the amazing elements that make me who I am. And the same goes for you.

Nathaniel Branden Image Credit: http://mylifebook.com/blog/dr-nathaniel-branden-explores-romantic-love-and-effective-communication/

Nathaniel Branden
Image Credit: http://mylifebook.com/blog/dr-nathaniel-branden-explores-romantic-love-and-effective-communication/

So began my true journey of self-love. As a term, “self-esteem” was first introduced by William James in 1890. It is one of the oldest concepts in psychology. I personally identify more with Nathaniel Branden’s definition from 1969, stating that self-esteem is a relationship between one’s competence and one’s worthiness. Branden is considered the father of the self-esteem movement, and this definition sees self-esteem as the result of dealing with challenges of living in a worthy or respectable way and doing so consistently over time. There is no doubt in my mind that self-esteem and self-love go hand-in-hand and together take a journey to achieve. It is here where I find myself today, in the early stages of a, what I presume to be life-long, journey toward increasingly powerful self-love. The self-esteem movement really began in the 1960’s, when self-esteem first became an attractive and influential idea. 

Taking a look at Psychology Today, you’ll find that self-love is appreciation for oneself that grows from actions that support our physical, psychological, and spiritual growth. It is dynamic, and it grows by actions that mature us. When we act in ways that expand our self-love, we begin to accept our weaknesses and our strengths, we have less need to explain our shortcomings, we have compassion for ourselves, we are more centered in our life purpose and values, and we expect living fulfillment through our own efforts.

It is important to understand that you cannot obtain self-love from an outside source. Self-love must be obtained by you and for you. Again, we often turn to outside sources for encouragement, reassurance, or a confidence boost, but we need to find our own reasons within ourselves to feel encouraged, reassured, and confident. Also, understand that you will not reach a full state of self-love overnight. Self-love takes time, so be patient with yourself as you walk through this journey. Understand that everyone is capable of obtaining a state of self-love, as long as they put forth the effort and give it time. Join me on this journey and together we will begin to truly seek a state of love for ourselves.

By Chanelle Surphlis


Chanelle Surphlis is a Campus Clipper publishing intern, who is graduating from FIT this May. Passionate about giving back and pursuing volunteer opportunities, Chanelle aspires to work for a fashion or beauty company that includes philanthropy in its core values. If you like Chanelle’s writing, check out her blogs here and here. We have the most talented interns ever and we’re so proud of them! For over 20 years, the Campus Clipper has been offering awesome student discounts in NYC,  from the East Side to Greenwich Village. Along with inspiration, the company offers students a special coupon booklet and the Official Student Guide, which encourage them to discover new places in the city and save money on food, clothing and services.  

At the Campus Clipper, not only do we help our interns learn new skills, make money, and create wonderful e-books, we give them a platform to teach others. Check our website for more student savings and watch our YouTube video showing off some of New York City’s finest students during the Welcome Week of 2015. 

Become a fan on Facebook and follow us on Twitter and Instagram!

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How Not to Do Anything: An Expert Guide – How Not to Be Relied On

Saturday, November 5th, 2016
Image Credit: http://www.moores.com.au/news/unreliable-employee

Image Credit: http://www.moores.com.au/news/unreliable-employee

Despite all of your finest efforts to shirk responsibility and lead a duty-free life, if you have any friends or family, you are constantly at risk of having someone try to foist some of their own well-earned obligations on you. Even if you diligently avoid the serious commitment of having a pet or a child, an aunt, neighbor, or friend can swoop in at any moment and ask you to be a good nephew/neighbor/friend and take care of their poodle or their daughter for anywhere from a few minutes to a few days. Such a request might appear perfectly reasonable to a “busy” person, since you seem to have so much time on your hands, but who are they to presume that you can act as their butler on a moment’s notice? You had some big, um, plans for this week.

Like most of the advice in this tome, the solution to this problem is rather obvious: if you don’t want to be relied on, simply be as unreliable as possible. Assure (“yeah, sure”) your neighbor that you’ll feed his fish each day that he’s away, but don’t worry too much about the details; fish don’t need to eat every day, and a week’s worth of food can be supplied at one time. If, God forbid, your neighbor’s fish tank were to turn into a noxious wastebowl, or an unlucky fish were to die, then you could rest easy knowing that you’d never again be asked to take care of anything for your neighbor.

At times when you can’t exactly blow off an inherited task, for instance, when you’re expected to watch a child, tardiness can be an excellent way of saying “don’t count on me” without doing anything really heinous or taking out your frustration on the child, who is of course not responsible for his or her own existence. Most parents will go so far as to give up on free babysitting if they can’t be sure that the babysitter (you) will show up even remotely on time. The really essential thing is not (necessarily) to do a terrible job whenever asked to do something for someone else, but to plant a sweet little seed of doubt in the minds of those who may try to foist a task on you. It shouldn’t be too hard to find someone who’s more reliable than you are.

By Aaron Brown


Aaron Brown was one of the Campus Clipper’s publishing interns, who wrote an e-book “How Not To Do Anything: An Expert Guide.” If you like Aaron’s writing, follow our blog for more chapters from his e-book. We have the most talented interns ever and we’re so proud of them! For over 20 years, the Campus Clipper has been offering awesome student discounts in NYC,  from the East Side to Greenwich Village. Along with inspiration, the company offers students a special coupon booklet and the Official Student Guide, which encourage them to discover new places in the city and save money on food, clothing and services.  

At the Campus Clipper, not only do we help our interns learn new skills, make money, and create wonderful e-books, we give them a platform to teach others. Check our website for more student savings and watch our YouTube video showing off some of New York City’s finest students during last year’s Welcome Week.

Become a fan on Facebook and follow us on Twitter and Instagram!

 

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How to Find an Apartment in NYC: A Guide for Students – Conclusion

Saturday, September 3rd, 2016
Image Credit: http://1000awesomethings.com/2011/12/05/99-getting-the-keys-to-your-first-apartment/

Image Credit: http://1000awesomethings.com/2011/12/05/99-getting-the-keys-to-your-first-apartment/

At the end of the day, just remember that despite the stress, heartache, and bumps in the road that you will likely encounter, things are going to work out. You’re not the first person to search for an apartment, even though it may feel that way. I won’t lie to you, finding the apartment of your dreams may not be the most realistic thing right now, though it is a nice goal to have. At this point, your apartment hunting should be viewed as a learning experience that will help you long after you move out. And by going into the search with some information, you’ll feel better about the experience.

 Good luck, and happy hunting!

By Alex Agahigian


Alex Agahigian was one of the Campus Clipper’s publishing interns, who wrote an e-book on how to find an apartment in NYC. This was the last chapter of her e-book. Follow our blog for more chapters from various students’ e-books. We have the most talented interns ever! For over 20 years, the Campus Clipper has been offering awesome student discounts in NYC,  from the East Side to Greenwich Village. Along with inspiration, the company offers students a special coupon booklet and the Official Student Guide, which encourage them to discover new places in the city and save money on food, clothing and services.  

At the Campus Clipper, not only do we help our interns learn new skills, make money, and create wonderful e-books, we give them a platform to teach others. Check our website for more student savings and watch our YouTube video showing off some of New York City’s finest students during last year’s Welcome Week.

Become a fan on Facebook and follow us on Twitter and Instagram!

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How to Find an Apartment in NYC: A Guide for Students – Emergencies

Saturday, August 27th, 2016
Image Credit: http://www.lockaroundtheclock.com.au/locked-out/

Image Credit: http://www.lockaroundtheclock.com.au/locked-out/

Once you’ve moved in, you need to be aware that you no longer have an R.A. on your floor. You probably won’t have a doorman either. And there probably isn’t a mailroom or package center, so you’ll be the person signing for incoming packages. In certain situations, there are fool-proof ways to ensure you never have a problem. Don’t lose keys or get locked out by giving someone who doesn’t live in your building an extra set. That way, in an emergency you can reach them and don’t have to pay for a locksmith.

While dorms have R.A.s you can speak to when there are building issues or problems with your neighbors, the reality of apartment living is that you are essentially on your own. If there is a problem, you will have to speak with the people you’re living with. Sometimes, to avoid this issue, you can leave a note in your hallway. But the best thing to do is probably knock on the offender’s door. You’re not going to get peace and quiet 24/7, but if it’s been multiple weekdays of 3am parties, it doesn’t hurt to remind your neighbors that you are a student, and you would greatly appreciate their understanding that while you don’t mind parties, you do need some sleep. If you don’t get the response you want, talk to your landlord or other neighbors, and see if there is anything that can be done.

 If something in your apartment breaks, such as your toilet or stove, call your super. It’s his responsibility to take care of repairs, as long as the appliances broke down for reasons not directly related to you. Always remember that you’re renting the space, so, when you leave, everything needs to be in the same condition you found it in. There will be minor wear and tear, but there shouldn’t be a myriad of issues when you leave, or you’ll risk losing your security deposit.

By Alex Agahigian


Alex Agahigian was one of the Campus Clipper’s talented publishing interns, who wrote an e-book on how to find an apartment in NYC. Follow our blog to read more chapters from Alex’s e-book and use her advice to make your own apartment-hunting more fun and easy. For over 20 years, the Campus Clipper has been offering awesome student discounts in NYC,  from the East Side to Greenwich Village. Along with inspiration, the company offers students a special coupon booklet and the Official Student Guide, which encourage them to discover new places in the city and save money on food, clothing and services.  

At the Campus Clipper, not only do we help our interns learn new skills, make money, and create wonderful ebooks, we give them a platform to teach others. Follow each new blog post to read a chapter of our various books and to learn how the Campus Clipper can help you follow your dreams!

Stay tuned for more tips from Alex on apartment hunting, check our website for more student savings and watch our YouTube video showing off some of New York City’s finest students during last year’s Welcome Week.

Become a fan on Facebook and follow us on Twitter and Instagram!

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How to Find an Apartment in NYC: A Guide for Students – Landlord / Lease

Monday, August 22nd, 2016
Image Credit:  http://blog.easyroommate.com/responsibilities-landlord/

Image Credit:
http://blog.easyroommate.com/responsibilities-landlord/

While you shouldn’t be suspicious of everyone in New York, you need to be on your guard around your landlord. One of the most common issues with landlords is that they find reasons to not give you your security deposit back. In order to ensure this doesn’t happen to you, and no long legal battle ensues, demand a walk-thru and a walk-out when you move into the apartment and exit. If your landlord doesn’t want to do this, request the super does it with you instead. Take plenty of pictures of the floors, the appliances, and the walls as you’re moving in. If there are any major problems with the apartment, bring them to the attention of your super and landlord as soon as possible. You may think some scratches on the floor or a dent in a door isn’t a big deal, but your landlord may attempt to hold onto part of your security deposit, claiming there was damage done. If you take extra steps in the beginning, you won’t have to deal with a larger problem later.

You should keep both your super’s phone number and your landlord’s number saved in your phone, especially if your super doesn’t live in the building. Additionally you should familiarize yourself with a list of tenant rights and responsibilities, which can easily be found online.

By Alex Agahigian


Alex Agahigian was one of the Campus Clipper’s talented publishing interns, who wrote an e-book on how to find an apartment in NYC. Follow our blog to read more chapters from Alex’s e-book and use her advice to make your own apartment-hunting more fun and easy. For over 20 years, the Campus Clipper has been offering awesome student discounts in NYC,  from the East Side to Greenwich Village. Along with inspiration, the company offers students a special coupon booklet and the Official Student Guide, which encourage them to discover new places in the city and save money on food, clothing and services.  

At the Campus Clipper, not only do we help our interns learn new skills, make money, and create wonderful ebooks, we give them a platform to teach others. Follow each new blog post to read a chapter of our various books and to learn how the Campus Clipper can help you follow your dreams!

Stay tuned for more tips from Alex on apartment hunting, check our website for more student savings and watch our YouTube video showing off some of New York City’s finest students during last year’s Welcome Week.

Become a fan on Facebook and follow us on Twitter and Instagram!

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How to Find an Apartment in NYC: A Guide for Students – Search

Monday, August 15th, 2016
Image Credit: http://www.fastweb.com/student-life/articles/apartment-hunting-questions

Image Credit: http://www.fastweb.com/student-life/articles/apartment-hunting-questions

I know it seems like we’ve been building up to this for a while, but the final thing you should do before you go out and search is to make a list of things you do and don’t want in an apartment. While this may sound silly, it’s easy to get overwhelmed after looking at multiple apartments, and forget what is important and what isn’t. Once you have your list, come prepared. Bring a camera, pens, notebooks, and if you can, someone besides the person you’re living with. A parent or some other mentor is always helpful because two heads are better than one. They may be able to point out something you haven’t considered. Don’t forget to ask about building amenities, such as laundry. Check the water pressure of sinks and the shower. Consider how many flights of stairs you’re willing to walk up. Take your time when you’re in the apartment, and feel things out.

While Craigslist.org has gotten a bad rap, it’s a great resource for finding apartments straight from the previous renter. But if you’re wary, there are other great resources. Your college/university usually has resources for students. There’re websites like nofeerentals.com you can use. You can also go with a broker, but, unfortunately, there are fees involved—sometimes as high as 15-20% of a year’s rent. It’s better to cut out the middle-man and find an apartment through other resources.

You should start looking 6 weeks to a month in advance. Anything prior will be tricky, as most rental apartments are trying to be turned over quickly. Schedule looking at many apartments during the course of a day, and then narrow down your choices after a few of these excursions. It’s common for the person you want to rent from to pressure you, letting you know the apartment will go off the market soon. And though the turnover rate is fast, it’s better to make sure you really like the place than feeling panicked and rushing into a decision.

By Alex Agahigian


Alex Agahigian was one of the Campus Clipper’s talented publishing interns, who wrote an e-book on how to find an apartment in NYC. Follow our blog to read more chapters from Alex’s e-book and use her advice to make your own apartment-hunting more fun and easy. For over 20 years, the Campus Clipper has been offering awesome student discounts in NYC,  from the East Side to Greenwich Village. Along with inspiration, the company offers students a special coupon booklet and the Official Student Guide, which encourage them to discover new places in the city and save money on food, clothing and services.  

At the Campus Clipper, not only do we help our interns learn new skills, make money, and create wonderful ebooks, we give them a platform to teach others. Follow each new blog post to read a chapter of our various books and to learn how the Campus Clipper can help you follow your dreams!

Stay tuned for more tips from Alex on apartment hunting, check our website for more student savings and watch our YouTube video showing off some of New York City’s finest students during last year’s Welcome Week.

Become a fan on Facebook and follow us on Twitter and Instagram!

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How to Find an Apartment in NYC: A Guide for Students – Expenses

Monday, August 8th, 2016
Image Credit: http://www.appsgalery.com/apps-by-rosi-reddy-8695

Image Credit:
http://www.appsgalery.com/apps-by-rosi-reddy-8695

If you’ve been living in a dorm or your parents’ house up until this point, you’re going to experience a new form of expenses: utility bills. It is very rare in New York City to have an apartment with utilities included (though hot water and heat must be provided by your landlord). The rates for electric bills alone are staggering, and if you engage in the behaviors you likely did pre-electric bill paying, you’re going to find yourself dealing with almost triple digit sums at the end of the month. In addition, there are no dining halls in apartments, so you’re going to have to have a food budget. And since you’ll probably be cooking, you’ll also be paying a fee for the gas that powers your stove and oven.

With this in mind, it may be helpful to make a list of all the estimated expenses, so you have a better understanding of what financial life will be like once you’re in your own apartment. And if things seem a little too extravagant, brainstorm with your parents and roommate on how to keep costs down. Remember to unplug your laptops, chargers, etc. in order to keep your electric bills reasonable. And if you know you won’t be using your stove at all, call Con Edison and tell them to turn off your gas, otherwise you’ll still be paying $10-20 a month for a service you’re not even using.

You’ll also have to decide whether to get Internet and/or cable television. Some people find cable a luxury that’s not realistic or affordable. So opting for a cell phone and Internet in lieu of a landline and cable can be a good option. Also, to help avoid food budget problems, consider going to farmer’s markets instead of the grocery store. The Union Square Greenmarket has in-season produce, which keeps costs down, and the prices are sometimes negotiable. And when going to the grocery store, bring coupons and stick to a list to avoid impulse shopping and overspending. Make delivery a treat when you’re in the middle of finals week and need a break without wasting time. And if you save going out to eat for special occasions, you’ll enjoy saving money and the occasional indulgence.

By Alex Agahigian


Speaking of saving on going out, here are some great student savings from Stuyvesant Organic with this Campus Clipper coupon:

StuyvesantOrganic

For over 20 years, the Campus Clipper has been offering awesome student discounts in NYC,  from the East Side to Greenwich Village. Along with inspiration, the company offers students a special coupon booklet and the Official Student Guide, which encourage them to discover new places in the city and save money on food, clothing and services.  

At the Campus Clipper, not only do we help our interns learn new skills, make money, and create wonderful ebooks, we give them a platform to teach others. Follow each new blog post to read a chapter of our various books and to learn how the Campus Clipper can help you follow your dreams!

Stay tuned for more tips from Alex on apartment hunting, check our website for more student savings and watch our YouTube video showing off some of New York City’s finest students during last year’s Welcome Week.

Become a fan on Facebook and follow us on Twitter and Instagram!

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How to Find an Apartment in NYC: A Guide for Students – Neighborhoods

Monday, August 1st, 2016
Image credit: https://media.timeout.com/images/102906033/225/169/image.jpg

Image credit:
https://media.timeout.com/images/ 102906033/225/169/image.jpg

When looking for an apartment, another important aspect to remember is the neighborhood you’re going to live in. This will not only help narrow down your search by limiting where you’ll be looking, but it will also give you a better idea of what you’re looking for in off-campus housing. At the top of your list of considerations should be how far your neighborhood is from your school, what kinds of public transportation is available, what amenities are in the area, and the safety of the neighborhood. You should ask yourself, will you feel comfortable walking alone in your neighborhood after dark? Will you be able to find food and household supplies easily? How far away is the bus/subway and does it run regularly?

While you may think you’re saving money by opting to live in a neighborhood that’s a little far from your school but with lower rent, remember that a monthly metro card in New York City is currently over $100. And you don’t want to live in a place that’s so far from your classes that it’s a struggle to be on-time. Narrow down your choices before you start hunting, as this will make things easier when you’re ready to look at apartments.

I would love nothing more than to list every neighborhood in the five boroughs and give you a detailed list of statistics about them all, but the truth is neighborhoods are always changing. If you try to stay completely current based on literature your head will spin. The best thing to do is talk to your friends who live in different neighborhoods and get their opinion. And be sure to visit neighborhoods yourself. Statistics offer some information, but the best information you can get will come from hands-on experience.

By Alex Agahigian


Alex Agahigian was one of the Campus Clipper’s talented publishing interns, who wrote an e-book on how to find an apartment in NYC. Follow our blog to read more chapters from Alex’s e-book and use her advice to make your own apartment-hunting more fun and easy. For over 20 years, the Campus Clipper has been offering awesome student discounts in NYC,  from the East Side to Greenwich Village. Along with inspiration, the company offers students a special coupon booklet and the Official Student Guide, which encourage them to discover new places in the city and save money on food, clothing and services.  

At the Campus Clipper, not only do we help our interns learn new skills, make money, and create wonderful ebooks, we give them a platform to teach others. Follow each new blog post to read a chapter of our various books and to learn how the Campus Clipper can help you follow your dreams!

Stay tuned for more tips from Alex on apartment hunting, check our website for more student savings and watch our YouTube video showing off some of New York City’s finest students during last year’s Welcome Week.

Become a fan on Facebook and follow us on Twitter and Instagram!

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How to Find an Apartment in NYC: A Guide for Students – Roommate (s)

Monday, July 25th, 2016
Image Credit: https://www.unh.edu/housing/living-roommate

Image Credit: https://www.unh.edu/housing/living-roommate

Deciding whether to have a roommate or to live alone should be settled on before you even begin hunting for an apartment. A very common mistake students make is thinking that moving in with a friend is a great plan that doesn’t require serious talk or consideration. Unfortunately, this isn’t the case. No matter who the candidate is, you need to sit down with your potential roommate and go over several things before making a final decision. Some important things to talk about are: the logistics of who will be paying, the neighborhoods you’re willing to live in, and your expectations about cleanliness and guests. While every little detail doesn’t have to be figured out between you and your potential roommate, you need to be clear and honest in your expectations. Once your name is on a lease, your credit is on the line. So if you aren’t firm about not wanting parties at the apartment, or ensuring your roommate has a viable job that can pay rent, you may lose your security deposit, or worse. Initial discomfort when talking about tough subjects will pave the way for an easier time farther down the road.

If living with a friend isn’t an option, then there are plenty of resources to find a roommate online. Facebook and Craigslist are two great sites. And you can also print out ads and post them around your school. Some schools even have resources that help you find roommates as part of their off-campus housing department. Just ask around and don’t worry that you’ll end up settling for a roommate who’s not a good fit. At any given time, tons of students are looking for roommates, so you’ll find your perfect match. Just give yourself time. Generally a month or two is enough notice.

Additionally, if parents are going to be involved in paying for the apartment, it might make sense for you to meet them as well. It will give you peace of mind, knowing how much financial support your roommate is getting. And if your roommate is going to be paying rent himself or herself, don’t hesitate to ask questions about her work and income. While these aren’t the easiest things to go over with a stranger or friend, minor discomfort now will prevent any miscommunications or issues when you’ve moved in and signed a yearlong lease.

By Alex Agahigian


Alex Agahigian was one of the Campus Clipper’s talented publishing interns, who wrote an e-book on how to find an apartment in NYC. Follow our blog to read more chapters from Alex’s e-book and use her advice to make your own apartment-hunting more fun and easy. For over 20 years, the Campus Clipper has been offering awesome student discounts in NYC,  from the East Side to Greenwich Village. Along with inspiration, the company offers students a special coupon booklet and the Official Student Guide, which encourage them to discover new places in the city and save money on food, clothing and services.  

At the Campus Clipper, not only do we help our interns learn new skills, make money, and create wonderful ebooks, we give them a platform to teach others. Follow each new blog post to read a chapter of our various books and to learn how the Campus Clipper can help you follow your dreams!

Stay tuned for more tips from Alex on apartment hunting, check our website for more student savings and watch our YouTube video showing off some of New York City’s finest students during last year’s Welcome Week.

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