Posts Tagged ‘food’

What cooking is for me, and what it can be for you too

Tuesday, July 18th, 2017

As you have probably understood so far, I value my relationship with food more than the next person, but what I value even more is the time I spend preparing my food. While living at home I was lucky enough, in many ways, to have food ready for me waiting on the table as I got back from school. Though at the time it was the best way I could have imagined things, I had no idea how passionate I would become about preparing my own food daily.

cook2

It’s common to see cooking as a chore, and in many ways, it can be. I’m sure that after a day of very hard work when one gets home in time for dinner, the last thing one wants to do is actually have to spend a significant amount of time cooking. However, in my everyday life, I’ve found that instead of dreading the times of day when I have to cook, I actually look forward to them. Not only am I happy during the process of cooking but I’m also proud of what I’ve ended up creating. For me, cooking has become, an escape, a time to relax, and a way to feel a small sense of accomplishment throughout the day. You could even say that it has become a small way for me to meditate…

 

I definitely benefit from my small cooking ritual, and I think if you follow the following steps you might too:

 

  • The Environment

 

First things first, the most important factor is always the environment. Obviously, if we all had amazing, huge, well-lit, chef-worthy kitchens, we would probably all enjoy cooking more. Nonetheless, there are a few things you can do to make your dorm’s or small student apartment’s kitchen more enjoyable. For starters, lighting is key, so if you can, invest in making your kitchen well lit. Next, I’d suggest getting a few good basic appliances, pots and pans to make your cooking struggles easier. Lastly, the miscellaneous but -oh so- important things will make a world of difference: some plants (extra points if they are basil, coriander or mint), some cute kitchen towels as well as oven mitts, and some fun fridge magnets or maybe some pictures on the wall. After you’ve set up your kitchen, it is your job to keep it that way, by cleaning and making it an environment you want to stay in.

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  • Your Ingredients

 

Secondly, as any good chef will tell you: good ingredients make the best dishes. I’d suggest finding a store you like, getting familiar with it, and making it a habit of going to shop there for your groceries. In time, shopping for groceries will stop being a hassle and will instead become a peaceful time, in a known environment, without all the frustration it can sometimes have. Furthermore, ensuring you have high quality ingredients every time will show in your final product, which will, in the long term, benefit you greatly, both in your health and wellbeing. One of my favorite places to shop at is Lifesum Market, on 6th avenue and 8th street. I love it, as it is close to campus and my apartment, but most importantly because it carries only organic produce and packaged items. Another crucial factor which makes Lifesum one of my favorite stores is the discount I get from the Campus Clipper.

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  • Your Motivation

 

Another key factor in improving your relationship with your kitchen is having real reasons why you want to do so. That is, you have to get educated and understand the benefits of cooking your own food. By knowing what goes inside your food you are in charge of your health and thus in charge of one, if not, the biggest parts of your life. Furthermore, in the long term, by incorporating meal prepping and some money saving hacks, you’ll see how cooking can be very cost effective, helping you adhere to your student budget. Or, if you’re like me, you’ll even find a peaceful escape in cooking, which helps you reboot during the day. Whatever the reason, finding your motivation is key in succeeding.

 

  • The Inspiration

 

After you’ve managed all three previous steps, it is time to get inspired. This means that it’s time to find what exactly you want to make and what gets you most excited to create in your own safe space, in your own way. Finding inspiration is key, as it will take cooking from being a chore to becoming a fun way to pass the time, to be creative and to feel a sense of accomplishment. My grandfather used to say that anyone who likes to eat will eventually know how to cook. So, find what you like to eat and make it for yourself. I suggest getting a few cookbooks that look appealing to you, but have recipes anyone can execute. Or, if you like, you could spend hours, as I do, on websites, blogs and YouTube looking at all the wonderful things people manage to made with just a handful of ingredients. The only thing I am certain of, is that somewhere out there, there is something that you’d love to make again, or make your way, so find it and get cooking.

cook

  • Relaxation

 

Above all, as always, what is more important is that you stay relaxed. If you actually get into cooking and find some enjoyment in it, don’t worry if all you have time to make that day is a grilled cheese sandwich. Any type of food is fuel, but the best fuel is the food you make yourself. Don’t be too hard on yourself when you don’t make something great or if it’s the 10th time you’ve made spaghetti and you still make them mushy. Try to appreciate the fact that you’re trying to do something that is good for you. Every moment that you spend in your kitchen, trying to make something healthy for your body is a moment that you spend showing love for yourself and your body.

 

 

By Marina Theophanopoulou

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Marina Theophanopoulou is a Campus Clipper publishing intern who is studying Philosophy and Sociology as a junior at NYU. Passionate about healthy, food and wellness, Marina aspires to make others think of food in a more holistic way. For over 20 years, the Campus Clipper has been offering awesome student discounts in NYC,  from the East Side to Greenwich Village. Along with inspiration, the company offers students a special coupon booklet and the Official Student Guide, which encourage them to discover new places in the city and save money on food, clothing and services. 

At the Campus Clipper, not only do we help our interns learn new skills, make money, and create wonderful e-books, we give them a platform to teach others. Check our website for more student savings and watch our YouTube video showing off some of New York City’s finest students during the Welcome Week of 2015.

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From New York to….Paris

Wednesday, July 5th, 2017

Paris is known for a lot of things…the lights, the romance, those little Eiffel Towel trinkets, but nothing compares to the food. From the most delicately prepared escargot to the finely aged wine and cheese, the French know food…though that’s not to say New Yorkers don’t.

http://therealwinejulia.com/

http://therealwinejulia.com/

https://www.sandaya.fr/

https://www.sandaya.fr/

So, how does a perfect night of food in Paris compare to one in New York? Usually I just give you tips on how to tackle a variety of issues in New York and another city with the hopes that if you like New York for one reason, you’ll fall head over heals in that other city for the same reaosn. But since food is close to my heart, I’ve instead listed two “perfect” nights of food for you to fall in love with, one for the city of love and one for the city that never sleeps. I hope one day you’ll get to compare the two:

A Night in Paris

So you’ve found a way to Paris and experienced the romance of kissing at its center and walking alone the Seine and now you’re hungry. Do I have a night for you. The credit for most of this goes to NYU London’s Tony Skitt, but I’ve made a few modifications from personal experience. An aperitif is a dry alcoholic drink taken before dinner. A kir is a traditional French aperitif and some of the best can be found at Chez Georges (get there early, it opens at 6pm but it’s hard to get just kir when this place gets crowded) on the rue des Canettes in the Latin Quarter. Then for your main meal try Chez Fernand around the corner. Now that you’re stuffed, you have to get dessert. The Île de Saint-Louis behind Notre Dame (quite the sight at night) boasts to have the best ice cream in the world. For this you have two options: Berthillion ice cream, which claim to be the best, or my personal favorite, La Brasserie de l’Isle Saint-Louis. It’s not an ice cream place, but their chocolate ice cream is amazing nonetheless—and if Chez Fernand left you wanting, the escargot is pretty good too. From here you could do one of two things. One option is going to a jazz club called Caveau de la Huchette (on rue de la Huchette) which is the place for swing dancing in Paris and a way to dance off all those carbs (the place really starts picking up at 11pm). Another is to buy a nice bottle of Parisian wine and a a box of chocolate (or if you’re a broke college kid, like me, a cheap bottle of wine and the smallest box of Lindt chocolate you can find) and sit by the river across from the Eiffel Tower. There’s a small parking lot directly across from the tower along Port Debilly that has steps leading down to the river that provides the most stunning view.

Ice cream at La Brasserie de l'Isle Saint-Louis. Taken by Jainita Patel

Ice cream at La Brasserie de l’Isle Saint-Louis. Taken by Jainita Patel

La Brasserie de l'Isle Saint-Louis. Taken by Jainita Patel

La Brasserie de l’Isle Saint-Louis. Taken by Jainita Patel

View from across the river. Taken by Jainita Patel

View from across the river. Taken by Jainita Patel

 

A Night in New York

Paris is beautiful and expensive and charming, but nothing says food and fun like a night out in New York City. Not only does New York have the ability to provide a fun and stunning night, but the diversity in New York is also one of its biggest assets. In place of an aperitif to get the appetite stirring, I suggest getting your stomach grumbling by stopping at La Churreria in Nolita sometime in the late afternoon. This place has the best hot churros and chocolate I’ve ever had. It’s a small venue, but cheap and delicious. Now for the entrée. Where to even begin? Well, since we’re all trying to save, I would recommend Momofuku Noodle Bar or Superiority Burger if you’re starving. Both are cheap eats that will fill you up. If you’re saving for dessert, you can save with left overs and what college kid doesn’t love leftovers? Another option is also HandCraft Kitchen and Cocktails, which the Campus Clipper intern team recently visited and has some of the most unique dishes I’ve ever had. For dessert, a lot of places will claim that they’re the best, but me, a stranger on the internet, is telling you definitively that Veniero’s in the East Village is the best. It’s right next to Momofuku, so you might need to go for a walk before you come back here, but it has the best Italian pastries and gelato I’ve ever had. Even Eataly doesn’t come close (when it comes to dessert I mean). It’s open until 1am so you’ll have plenty of time. After (or maybe before) dessert, there are a few things you can do to digest. You can go dancing or drinking in some of the fun venues I’ve mentioned before, or you can take a pastry to go and sit in East River Park to see the lit up Empire State Building to the left and Brooklyn straight ahead.

 

Handcraft Kitchen and Cocktails http://gitr.com/wp-content/

Handcraft Kitchen and Cocktails
http://gitr.com/wp-content/

The best place in the world. http://media.yellowbot.com/

The best place in the world.
http://media.yellowbot.com/

There you have it. Two foodie adventures in two amazing cities. And who knows? If you like New York or Paris mainly because of its food, maybe one day you’ll get a chance to visit the other.

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By Jainita Patel

Jainita is a Campus Clipper publishing intern who is double majoring in English and Environmental Studies at NYU. Though writing fiction and painting are her two main passions, she also has a love of travel and adventure that has taken her across the globe.  Jainita writes under the pseudonym Jordan C. Rider. If you like her posts, you can find more of her work here or follow her on Twitter. For over 20 years, the Campus Clipper has been offering awesome student discounts in NYC,  from the East Side to Greenwich Village. Along with inspiration, the company offers students a special coupon booklet and the Official Student Guide, which encourage them to discover new places in the city and save money on food, clothing and services.  

At the Campus Clipper, not only do we help our interns learn new skills, make money, and create wonderful e-books, we give them a platform to teach others. Check our website for more student savings and watch our YouTube video showing off some of New York City’s finest students during the Welcome Week of 2015. 

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From New York to….Dublin

Wednesday, June 14th, 2017

When living in a big city, one of the best parts of the whole experience is the nightlife. Nightlife can in New York, with bars and venues to frequent and the never-ending flash of lights and promise.

Even so, it’s important to have fun and be safe while exploring the endless options New York has to offer. Just like New York, Dublin also has an air of fun that is accessible with an inexhaustible number of options.

http://www.activebackpacker.com

http://www.activebackpacker.com

stock-photo-temple-bar-district-in-dublin-at-night-100904953

https://lonelyplanetimages.imgix.net/

So what variety of activities can you do in New York and in Dublin after dark? Well in NYC after dark, the East Village is the place to be and in Dublin, the area around Temple Bar lives up to its name. Here a list of a few activities you can try in both cities that are sure to give you a night you’ll never forget:

Bars and Pubs

Drinking culture is very different in America and in Europe, but each definitely has its perks. In terms of bar culture, New York tends to be very loud and aggressive with tons of people and of course, tons of hard liquor. But if that’s your kind of scene, Keybar or Hair of the Dog might just be the place for you. If you happen to be in Dublin and are looking for something similar, try Temple Bar or the area around it. Though it’s a pub, with the amount of tourists and crowds there, it’ll feel just like an America bar. Pub culture, which is much more popular in Europe, tends to revolve around sitting and nursing a drink for a long time at a table of people. If this is more your speed, try the Mad Hatter on 3rd Ave in NYC. In Dublin, pubs are everywhere and Toners or Arthur’s Pub are great little places to drink and let loose on your night out. Themed pubs and bars are also big in New York. New York’s selection includes 60s beauty salons bars, Soviet Russia-themed bars, rooftop bars, and even one themed like a zombie hut!

Keybar http://keybar.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/09/2013-nov-102.jpg

Keybar
http://keybar.com/

Temple Bar Taken by Jainita Patel

Temple Bar
Taken by Jainita Patel

Clubs

Clubs are a good place if you don’t drink, but still want to have a crazy night out. The clubbing experience is not as popular or essential to a night out as going to bars or pubs in New York or Dublin, but it can certainly add a twist of fun to your night. If you’re avoiding Webster Hall in New York, Henrietta Hudson is a highly popular gay club in the West Village for good reason. Brooklyn also has some worthwhile clubs such as Bembe an exuberant Latin club in Williamsburg. In Dublin, Club Nassau is excellent if you want to dance the night away.

Food

If you want a more relaxed approach to a night out, food might be the way to go. Though Dublin doesn’t have many late-night venues open, Good World Chinese has great Dim Sum served until 3am. If you’re going from New York to Dublin and want some late night pizza, DiFontaine’s Pizza is open until 1am and apparently has pizza to rival NYC’s. In New York, you’ll find a ton of places that stay open way past a normal person’s bedtime—after all, it is the city that never sleeps—but once you get sick of dollar pizza, The Cheese Grille serves the best grilled cheese in the city and is open until 1am, but if you’re feeling fancy, Max Brenner on Broadway can be your midnight guilty pleasure.

Music and Comedy Venues

Music is a unique way to spend your night if you want to avoid the drinking scene. Arlene’s Grocery has different rock bands that perform every week. If you’re ever in Brooklyn, the Brooklyn Night Bazaar is also has popular artists that you can jam out to while playing games, eating local food, and shopping. In terms of comedy, Gotham Comedy Club is super popular in NYC and the Upright Citizens Brigade never fails to get some laughs. In Dublin, Whelan’s is a live music club that’s super casual and relaxed with deep Irish roots. Vicar Street holds events in both comedy and music. The Workman’s Club is a bar in Dublin, but it also hosts awesome artists that are crazy talented and most nights you can get in for less than €20.

Brooklyn Night Bazaar http://assets.nydailynews.com/

Brooklyn Night Bazaar
http://assets.nydailynews.com/

Vicar Street https://media-cdn.tripadvisor.com/

Vicar Street
https://media-cdn.tripadvisor.com/

So there it is, a nice compact list of things you can do when the sun goes down in both cities. Whether you’re out to forget the night the next morning or you’re getting dressed up just to go grab food and see a show, have fun and stay safe. And hey, maybe if you like the nightlife in NYC you’ll get a chance to experience it in Dublin one day or vice versa.

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By Jainita Patel

Jainita is a Campus Clipper publishing intern who is double majoring in English and Environmental Studies at NYU. Though writing fiction and painting are her two main passions, she also has a love of travel and adventure that has taken her across the globe.  Jainita writes under the pseudonym Jordan C. Rider. If you like her posts, you can find more of her work here or follow her on Twitter. For over 20 years, the Campus Clipper has been offering awesome student discounts in NYC,  from the East Side to Greenwich Village. Along with inspiration, the company offers students a special coupon booklet and the Official Student Guide, which encourage them to discover new places in the city and save money on food, clothing and services.  

At the Campus Clipper, not only do we help our interns learn new skills, make money, and create wonderful e-books, we give them a platform to teach others. Check our website for more student savings and watch our YouTube video showing off some of New York City’s finest students during the Welcome Week of 2015. 

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Caribbean Cuisine in the Bronx – Week 4

Tuesday, August 30th, 2016

In the past two chapters I wrote about the two ethnic cuisines that remind me most of home while being a student here in the city. In this chapter I am talking about the best Caribbean cuisine located in the Bronx. Caribbean culture was all very new to me when I first moved to New York. Previously living in California, I did not find as much Caribbean influence there as there is here in the city, due to its proximity to the West Indies. Since the early 1900s, Caribbean immigration to New York City had an influx of people from Jamaica, Haiti, Puerto Rico, and the Dominican Republic.

While all the countries have slightly different styles in cuisine, the majority of the dishes consist of rice, beans, plantains, jerk chicken and oxtail. I asked a fellow coworker of mine where she thought was the best place to get Caribbean cuisine in the Bronx. She was originally born in the Dominican Republic, but eventually gained citizenship and was raised in the Bronx. Jokingly she told me the best place for Dominican cuisine was in her mom’s kitchen, but then she told me about a restaurant called Feeding Tree.

Feeding Tree Menu photo credit: http://bit.ly/2caiNqL

Feeding Tree is located in the Bronx close to Yankee Stadium. Take the 4, B, or D train to the 161 St. Yankee Stadium stop and walk a short distance to the restaurant. It is a very simply decorated restaurant and the menu has two columns “meat dishes” and “seafood.” You choose a dish, and then which size you’d like. Most of the dishes remain under or around $10. Feeding Tree’s most popular dish is the oxtail meat platter, which comes with rice and another side. The service is great; the portions are filling, and, most importantly, you can adequately taste the flavors of Caribbean spices.

Oxtail Platter photo credit: http://bit.ly/2bA84BJ

If you have never eaten Caribbean food before, you should definitely give it a try, especially if you are into Indian and Eastern Asian cuisines. Similarly to those cuisines, Caribbean food is very flavorful and takes ingredients from those places it has been influenced. If you are also interested in immersing more into Caribbean culture, this Labor Day weekend the 49th annual New York Caribbean Carnival is kicking off on Thursday, September 1. This four-day extravagant event will include street vendors cooking up authentic Caribbean cuisine, music filled shows, vendors selling Caribbean jewelry/crafts and a carnival parade on Labor Day. The festival will take place in Crown Heights with the parade on Eastern Parkway. Next week, for my final chapter on ethnic cuisine outside Manhattan, I will be talking about the various food festivals that offer diverse options in cuisine all in one place!

 

Caribbean inspired costumes photo credit: http://bit.ly/2bw1D8D

By: Tricia Vuong
__________________________________________________________________________________________

Tricia Vuong is a publishing intern here at the Campus Clipper. She is currently studying Journalism + Design at Eugene Lang The New School for Liberal Arts with a minor in Global Studies. Check out more of her work on her portfolio.

For over 20 years, the Campus Clipper has been offering awesome student discounts in NYC,  from the East Side to Greenwich Village. Along with inspiration, the company offers students a special coupon booklet and the Official Student Guide, which encourage them to discover new places in the city and save money on food, clothing and services.  

At the Campus Clipper, not only do we help our interns learn new skills, make money, and create wonderful ebooks, we give them a platform to teach others. Follow each new blog post to read a chapter of our various books and to learn how the Campus Clipper can help you follow your dreams!

Stay tuned for more tips from Tricia on ethnic cuisine outside of Manhattan, check our website for more student savings and watch our YouTube video showing off some of New York City’s finest students during last year’s Welcome Week.

Become a fan on Facebook and follow us on Twitter and Instagram!

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Cheap Chinese Dishes – Week 3

Tuesday, August 23rd, 2016

I am a first generation Asian-American being half Vietnamese and half Chinese. My first language was Cantonese and I grew up eating Chinese dishes. My childhood memories are comprised of going to the Cleveland, Ohio’s Chinatown and eating dim sum on Sunday mornings. Dim sum was always a family event and the whole chaotic experience of ordering from the ladies pushing carts full of dumplings became familiar. Similarly to my last chapter, there are several dishes that remind me of home here in New York. In the last chapter I wrote about the best taco spot I’ve found that tasted and cost as close to the tacos back home in Southern California. This chapter, I am writing about the best Chinese dim sum and dishes that remind me of my childhood.

If you must settle for the Chinatown experience in Manhattan, there is one dim sum place I have been attending that has been able to avoid tourists and remain under $10. Skip the Yelp suggestions of Golden Unicorn, and Jing Fong and visit Sunshine on 27 Division Street. After several trials to other dim sum restaurants in Manhattan’s Chinatown, Sunshine is the most authentic I’ve tasted. It is a smaller restaurant unlike the very extravagant experience you’ll receive at Jing Fong, but the dumplings are always fresh and fairly priced. As most dim sum restaurants, the ladies push carts around the room filled with different types of dishes. The most popular dim sum dishes are typically har gow and shu mai. Har gow is shrimp encased in a rice paper dumpling and shu mai is a pork dumpling.

Front of Sunshine photo credit: http://bit.ly/2bK6633

Har gow, shu mai, and braised chicken feet photo credit: http://bit.ly/2bK5Ilh

The best part about Sunshine is that you share a large table with other parties similar as how they do in Hong Kong. Your party will get a complimentary pot of tea and the rest is up for you to decide what you want from the carts! There are a few vegetarian options but most of the dishes do contain meat so the dim sum experience isn’t for picky eaters. Don’t be afraid to point and ask to see what the dishes are. The ladies speak both Cantonese and Mandarin and although there can be a language barrier for those that do not know either, most of them usually show you what they have.

Walking down Canal Street you pass numerous vendors that are trying to appeal to tourists. If you want to skip the hustle and bustle of vendors selling knock off bags in Chinatown Manhattan, try a different kind of chaotic experience in Flushing, Queens. If you’re coming from Manhattan, hop on the 7 train from either Grand Central or Times Square. Take the 7 train all the way to its last stop, Flushing Main Street. There you will get off and be in the center of another Chinatown minus the tourists. Flushing, Queens offers two Asian malls equipped with clothing and grocery stores along with a food court. The New World Mall is a more Westernized experience while the Golden Mall is comprised of small hole in the wall shops. Both are within walking distance from the train stop. Check out the food court in both the malls as they have a variety of options such as hand-pulled Shanghai noodles and dumplings.

Pork dumpling w/ chives, shrimp, eggs at Tianjin Handmade Dumplings $4/12pcs photo credit: http://bit.ly/2bdhUha

As for dim sum in Flushing, Asian Jewels Seafood Restaurant offers tasty dishes and a great ambiance. Most dim sum restaurants are in large banquet-like rooms with white table cloths and red walls. Jing Fong and Golden Unicorn in Manhattan’s Chinatown appeal to the traditional dim sum aesthetics but their quality in the actual dishes are lacking. Asian Jewels in Flushing meets both of these points to having a great dim sum experience while also remaining budget friendly. Dishes are marked on your party’s stamp card in either the small, medium, or large section. You don’t really know what each dish costs unless you ask, but at the very end of your meal the waiter will total everything up. I’ve gone with a party of six and a party of just two and each time I hardly spend any more than $10. Sunshine in Chinatown, Manhattan and Asian Jewels in Flushing, Queens are the two tastiest Cantonese dim sum restaurants I’ve had here in New York.

Inside of Asian Jewels photo credit: http://bit.ly/2bdfZ7Q

 

 

 

 

Sunshine: 7 Division St, New York, NY 10013

New World Mall: 136-20 Roosevelt Ave, Flushing, NY 11354

Golden Shopping Mall41-36 Main St, Flushing, NY 11355

 

 

 

 

By: Tricia Vuong
__________________________________________________________________________________________

Tricia Vuong is a publishing intern here at the Campus Clipper. She is currently studying Journalism + Design at Eugene Lang The New School for Liberal Arts with a minor in Global Studies. Check out more of her work on her portfolio.

For over 20 years, the Campus Clipper has been offering awesome student discounts in NYC,  from the East Side to Greenwich Village. Along with inspiration, the company offers students a special coupon booklet and the Official Student Guide, which encourage them to discover new places in the city and save money on food, clothing and services.  

At the Campus Clipper, not only do we help our interns learn new skills, make money, and create wonderful ebooks, we give them a platform to teach others. Follow each new blog post to read a chapter of our various books and to learn how the Campus Clipper can help you follow your dreams!

Stay tuned for more tips from Tricia on ethnic cuisine outside of Manhattan, check our website for more student savings and watch our YouTube video showing off some of New York City’s finest students during last year’s Welcome Week.

Become a fan on Facebook and follow us on Twitter and Instagram!

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Street Tacos for $1.50 in Bushwick, Brooklyn – Week 2

Tuesday, August 16th, 2016

I grew up in Orange County, California and Mexican food was available almost everywhere. From authentic taqueria spots that were open twenty-four seven to chain restaurants like “Rubio’s” that had specials like fish taco Tuesdays, you could find a great dish on any block. After I moved to New York, I was determined to find a great Mexican taco spot that was also cost-friendly. When I lived in the city during my first year, I noticed that although there were Mexican restaurants, many of them were overpriced for portions that were not very filling. Even the Mexican chain, “Chipotle,” was slightly more costly here in the city compared to back home. After I moved to Bushwick, Brooklyn, I finally found a taco spot that tastes as great as it costs.

Bushwick, Brooklyn is historically and predominantly Hispanic. Most residents are Latino: from Puerto Rico, the Dominican Republic and immigrants from Mexico. Bushwick is the largest hub of Brooklyn’s Hispanic-American community with residents that have created businesses to support their own national and traditional cultures. Take the L or the M train to the Myrtle-Wycoff subway station and walk a short distance to Taqueria Izucar.

Exterior on Myrtle Avenue photo credit: http://nym.ag/2brmhTt

Located on the busy Myrtle Avenue between Menahan and Grove Street, this small business has a red awning that you can’t miss. When you walk in, there is just a small counter and a few open bar stools. Most people take their dishes for take out and they also do delivery if you’re in the neighborhood. Along with tacos, Taqueria Izucar offers other traditional dishes such as tortas, tostadas, enchiladas, and others. Their most popular taco is the “suadero,” which is a veal flank taco. Each taco comes with two corn tortillas, cilantro, onions, radish, lime, and salsa. Depending on the meat, prices vary but most of them are $1.50 per taco. If I am hungry, I typically get four tacos which costs only $6, an amazing deal! Even the taco truck outside the Myrtle-Wycoff subway station sells their tacos for $3+. All the dishes are made to order and they also accept both cash and card payments.

Suadero Tacos photo credit: http://bit.ly/2bipzHn

Currently Taqueria Izucar only has 33 reviews on Yelp, but a four star rating. New York Magazine says, “They know their way around a taco at this unexceptional-looking counter-service spot under the rumbling M train.” and the Village Voice has named it their “Best of NYC’s” taco in 2013. Be sure to visit Taqueria Izucar for some authentic tacos that won’t kill your budget. Next week, I will be writing about the best dim sum in Flushing, Queens!

Taqueria Izucar is located at:

1503 Myrtle Ave. Brooklyn, NY 11237 | 718-456-0569  | Mon-Thurs 11am-10pm Fri-Sun 11am-11pm

By: Tricia Vuong

__________________________________________________________________________________________

Tricia Vuong is a publishing intern here at the Campus Clipper. She is currently studying Journalism + Design at Eugene Lang The New School for Liberal Arts with a minor in Global Studies. Check out more of her work on her portfolio.

For over 20 years, the Campus Clipper has been offering awesome student discounts in NYC,  from the East Side to Greenwich Village. Along with inspiration, the company offers students a special coupon booklet and the Official Student Guide, which encourage them to discover new places in the city and save money on food, clothing and services.  

At the Campus Clipper, not only do we help our interns learn new skills, make money, and create wonderful ebooks, we give them a platform to teach others. Follow each new blog post to read a chapter of our various books and to learn how the Campus Clipper can help you follow your dreams!

Stay tuned for more tips from Tricia on ethnic cuisine outside of Manhattan, check our website for more student savings and watch our YouTube video showing off some of New York City’s finest students during last year’s Welcome Week.

Become a fan on Facebook and follow us on Twitter and Instagram!

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Student Savings on Ethnic Cuisine outside Manhattan – Week 1

Tuesday, August 9th, 2016

Being a college student in New York City allows you to have an array of food options to choose from. New York food staples such as dollar slice pizza and bagels are among these options. Say your taste buds are feeling a more unconventional dish, you’re also in luck because the city is filled with people from an array of diverse cultures, and the ethnic dishes they make.

When I first moved to New York two years ago, I was delighted by the variety of food choices I had. If I wanted to eat pad thai one night and pierogies the next, I could. There is a Chinatown, Little Italy, Ukrainian neighborhood, and a number of Indian restaurants in Murray Hill all within one borough.

Indian restaurant in Manhattan Photo credit: http://bit.ly/2bcSG2N

Manhattan is filled with neighborhoods that specialize in a particular cuisine because of the communities that immigrated here. Although it is filled with many diverse ethnic cuisines, I noticed that some of the places were overpriced and had an over the top aesthetic feel. I realized that if I wanted to have a more authentic experience trying these dishes while remaining within my student budget, my best bet would be to venture outside Manhattan and into the outer boroughs.

I am from California and grew up eating authentic Mexican food including street tacos for 50 cents, and also authentic Vietnamese cuisine. Little Saigon, the neighborhood I lived near in Southern California serves a large bowl of pho for three dollars. These are the dishes that remind me of home and I was determined to find places in New York that could comparably make these similar dishes and offer them at a reasonable price.

I highly advise students to explore other boroughs outside of Manhattan. If you are craving Mexican food, instead of opting for the local Chipotle around your apartment or over-priced trendy taco place in the city, venture out to Bushwick in Brooklyn. In my following chapter, I will be writing more about the best taco spot I have found that reminds me most of Southern California, and it is by far the cheapest taco place I have found in the city! In the following weeks, I will write more about the best dim sum in Flushing, Queens, Dominican food in the Bronx, and international food festivals that occur here in New York.

By: Tricia Vuong

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Tricia Vuong is a publishing intern here at the Campus Clipper. She is currently studying Journalism + Design at Eugene Lang The New School for Liberal Arts with a minor in Global Studies. Check out more of her work on her portfolio.

For over 20 years, the Campus Clipper has been offering awesome student discounts in NYC,  from the East Side to Greenwich Village. Along with inspiration, the company offers students a special coupon booklet and the Official Student Guide, which encourage them to discover new places in the city and save money on food, clothing and services.  

At the Campus Clipper, not only do we help our interns learn new skills, make money, and create wonderful ebooks, we give them a platform to teach others. Follow each new blog post to read a chapter of our various books and to learn how the Campus Clipper can help you follow your dreams!

Stay tuned for more tips from Tricia on ethnic cuisine outside of Manhattan, check our website for more student savings and watch our YouTube video showing off some of New York City’s finest students during last year’s Welcome Week.

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Cultural Cuisine: Eating Your Way Around the World

Monday, October 6th, 2014

Writer and traveler Deborah Cater once said, “You have to taste culture to understand it”—and she wasn’t wrong. When you go to a foreign country and choose to eat only foods you are familiar with then you’re doing yourself a disservice. Traveling is all about trying new things—and food is one of the most important ones. In China, there are so many unique local dishes to try so you shouldn’t let fear of the unknown get in the way of experiencing the country like the locals do.

Sure we’ve all gone to our local Chinese takeout place and have ordered the pork Lo Mein or General Tso Chicken, but if you take the time to explore the country you’ll find non-Americanized Chinese food that’s definitely worth a try.

One of the most popular dishes to try if you find yourself in Beijing is the Peking Duck. This famous dish has been prepared since the imperial era and is served with steamed pancakes and eaten with scallion, cucumber and sweet bean sauce. Traditionally the meat is sliced thin by the cook right in front of you, which is definitely fun to watch. Two of the most notable restaurants are Quanjude and Bianyifang in Beijing, China.

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A chef prepares to carve a Peking Duck.

Peking Duck is traditionally served on a duck shaped plate.

Peking Duck is traditionally served on a duck shaped plate.

 

We all know that Italy is famous for their pasta; but did you know that the world’s oldest known noodles were actually discovered along the Yellow River in China? Dating back to roughly 4000 years BP, noodles have been a staple food in China—and watching hand pulled noodles being made is definitely something to go see if you visit. Hand pulled noodles, or Lamian, is made by stretching and folding the dough into strands. This unique method of making noodles originated in China and dates back to 1504. Lamian literally means pull or stretch, lā, (拉), noodle, miàn (麵) and watching a professional noodle chef pull noodles is a tourist attraction in itself!

The process of preparing hand pulled noodles is so quick that it happens in a blur!

The process of preparing hand pulled noodles is so quick that it happens in a blur!

Whether you’re traveling to China, or any other country, make sure that if you have food allergies you are well prepared. The chefs know what ingredients they use to prepare their food with and a language barrier shouldn’t stop you from being safe. Having a restaurant card is a great way to stay safe, and still be able to enjoy many of the delicious unique foods available. The card clearly states in another language the types of food you are not allowed to eat and your servers and chefs can take it from there.

Gluten-Free restaurant card picture taken from www.chinahighlights.com/

Gluten-Free restaurant card picture taken from www.chinahighlights.com/

Also, take the time to find out if the water is safe to drink in your country of origin. Often times it’s just easier to choose to drink only bottled water for the duration of your stay. You know it’s clean and safe, and you definitely don’t want to get sick while studying abroad!

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-Sam Levitz is a graduate of Brooklyn College and went on the CUNY Study Abroad trip to China the summer of 2013. Follow her on Instagram: slevitz

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College Savings: How to Afford a Study Abroad Trip as a Broke College Student

Friday, September 19th, 2014

Whether my friends ask me if I want to go to the movies or out for an expensive meal, my answer is always the same: “I’m a college student.” This is the universally known phrase meaning, “I’d love to, but I can’t. I’m broke.” College expenses can really weigh down on my desire to have a social life. Between tuition, books, Metrocard fare, and food, there’s really no wiggle room for anything extra and I’m always trying to find college discounts wherever I go. When I learned about study abroad options through CUNY, my friends asked me where I wanted to go. “China,” I replied smiling. “But I’m a college student.”

Eating a bowl of noodles in Nanjing, China that cost 7¥ (yuan): less than $1.50!

Eating a bowl of noodles in Nanjing, China that cost 7¥ (yuan): less than $1.50!

Studying abroad, although costly, is not necessarily as impossible as one might think for the ‘poor’ college student—and it certainly has its perks. One way to help pay for your study abroad trip is to get scholarship money. Just like when you were applying for college, scholarships are diverse, obscure and available to a multitude of people. You just need to be willing to look for them. One great place to start is CEA Scholarships, which are scholarships specifically for students who want to study abroad. There are multiple merit based scholarships available and also financial need based scholarships.

Often times when applying for these scholarships you are required to write a personal essay. In order to get the money you need to make yourself stand out. Write several different essays, share them with your writing major friends, revise, and edit. The more work you put into your essay, the better chance you’ll have at getting that money. Other scholarships to look into for studying abroad are the SIROCS scholarship and the SASA Travel Abroad Scholarship.

You never know when you're going to stumble upon some interesting souvenir like a Communist Obama Tshirt!

You never know when you’re going to stumble upon some interesting souvenir like a Communist Obama Tshirt!

Don’t be afraid to go and contact the financial aid office at your college. Even if you don’t think you qualify for financial aid, go anyway. Sometimes the financial aid rules and regulations differ for certain study abroad programs and it never hurts to ask! Taking out student loans might also be a viable option to look into. Loans are a really great way to give yourself some time to save up your money after you take advantage of this once-in-a-lifetime opportunity.

Start saving up now! Even if you get fully covered by scholarships or financial aid, there’s still the matter of having spending money in a foreign country. Whether you want to buy a cheap bowl of noodles, or a memorable souvenir, you’re going to end up wanting to spend some cash on your trip. In Shenzhen, China I came across an amusement park called Windows of the World. I was definitely glad that I had some cash to pay for the admission. Get a part time job while you wait for the start of your program and put that cash aside. You’ll be happy you did once you get to your new temporary home. You want to be able to take care of yourself while you’re away and have some fun too!

 

 

My friends on the train ride at Windows of the World in Shenzhen, China.

My friends on the train ride at Windows of the World in Shenzhen, China.

-Sam Levitz is a graduate of Brooklyn College and went on the CUNY Study Abroad trip to China the summer of 2013. Follow her on Instagram: slevitz

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College Savings Experience by Studying Abroad

Saturday, September 13th, 2014
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Photo op with some monks my friends and I met on the Great Wall of China.

I like chicken soup. Wǒ xǐhuān jītāng.

It’s probably one of the only phrases I learned to say correctly in Mandarin while studying abroad in China and it still makes me laugh one year later.

No matter what college you go to, even if it’s only a few psychology courses online, everyone should go on a study abroad program at least once in their lifetime. Study abroad is a rite of passage and the college discounts you get is worth the experience. It’s the ability to say that during your young adult life you did something different and learned about a new place. It doesn’t matter what you do or where you go. What’s important is that you get out, see the world, and learn about a country that isn’t America.

One of the best benefits of studying abroad is that your early 20s is the best time to travel. Besides school, and maybe a part-time job, you don’t have that many obligations. Once you’re working the 9-5 grind you’ll find it’s extremely difficult to snag any vacation days right away. Studying abroad provides you with a way to get college credits without sitting in a classroom for an entire semester. Study abroad programs usually offer a variety of courses that range from common core classes to specific credits that can be used towards your major.

Studying abroad through your school is a great way to make friends that will be there after the trip. Most of the people that go on study abroad trips go to the same school. It’s very easy to form close friendships in a short amount of time on these trips. Walking across campus and seeing a familiar face is always a nice surprise in the middle of a hectic day.

 

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New friendships only grow stronger after hours of hiking the Yellow Mountain (Mt. Huangshan) in the southern Anhui province in eastern China.

People don’t just travel because of the boredom from living in the same place. People travel because they thirst to see something new. It’s one thing to see a picture of a famous landmark; it’s quite another to actually see that landmark with your own eyes. Ask anyone that’s ever traveled anywhere, or ask anyone with a smartphone camera; no photo or Instagram filter can truly ever beat the real thing. When you go home and change your profile picture on Facebook to a picture of yourself standing on the Great Wall of China—that’s something to brag about.

To learn about a culture that is foreign from your own is a truly important experience. There are so many different cultures in the world that it is impossible to count. To go through life ignorant of the world around you is a foolish mistake. Hear a different language slide past your lips. Eat a food that you can’t identify. Engross yourself in a way of living that you’ve never experienced.

A study abroad trip is more than just a trip. It’s a chance to take an adventure, fill a scrapbook with memories, and tell stories to your loved ones that will last a lifetime.

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Group picture of the 2013 Summer CUNY China trip in front of the Monk Xuanzang statue in Xi’an, China.

-Sam Levitz is a graduate of Brooklyn College and went on the CUNY Study Abroad trip to China the summer of 2013. Follow her on Instagram: slevitz

Follow the Campus Clipper on Twitter and Like us on Facebook!

Interested in more deals for students? Sign up for our bi-weekly newsletter to get the latest in student discounts and promotions  and follow our Tumblr and Pinterest. For savings on-the-go, download our printable coupon e-book!

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