Posts Tagged ‘wellness’

Triage: Learning to Prioritize And Reduce Stress

Saturday, July 29th, 2017

tri·age

trēˈäZH

noun

1.

(in medical use) the assignment of degrees of urgency to wounds or illnesses to decide the order of treatment of a large number of patients or casualties.

verb

1.

assign degrees of urgency to (wounded or ill patients).

A few years ago, a nurse told me, “You need to learn how to triage.” She was referring to my schoolwork and life balance using terminology from the hospital. Triage is the process of determining the urgency of a patient’s condition and prioritizing all patients by immediacy of need for transportation and care. For example, someone with an injury to their vital organs will obviously be prioritized above someone with a broken wrist. The nurse was the mother of someone close to me, and I was insulted because I thought she was criticizing my priorities and goals as being wrong. In retrospect, I realize what she saw: a stressed out college student who had no time for anything but school, starved of any fun and relaxation.

https://indulgy.com/

https://indulgy.com/

Ever since, I’ve been experimenting with how I prioritize time and goals. Sometimes I’m still not certain I’ve got it “right,” but I think this is true for everyone: balance is not a tidy endpoint with a bow on it. Life is always throwing us curve balls, and even when we see them coming we’re not always prepared for the blow. Priorities change, circumstances change, and our goals and estimations of what will make us happy change. And finding the right balance between the many facets of wellness, from exercise and diet to confidence and self presentation, relationships, sleep hygiene, and mental health—on top of the rest of life  (family, chores, school, work, and other responsibilities) is a process and a challenge. But there’s also no feeling like equilibrium. You will genuinely feel healthier, happier, more energetic, and more peaceful when you find it, whatever that equilibrium looks like for you.

In this eternal pursuit of balance, I’ve been learning how to triage. It seems simple and obvious in the context of a hospital and physical injuries, but it can be harder to do with school. Some instances are easy: Say you have a chemistry exam and a French quiz on the same day. The chemistry exam is worth 30 percent of your grade for the course, while the French quiz is 10 percent. You have a limited amount of time to study. Which one do you prioritize? For high-aiming achievers, making these kinds of judgments is inherently stressful because everything feels like a #1 priority. I’ve learned a few effective steps for prioritization that have helped me be a calmer, happier, healthier person, and I hope they help you too!

https://www.keepcalm-o-matic.co.uk

https://www.keepcalm-o-matic.co.uk

1. Write down all the tasks you need to get done

The list might look overwhelming at first, but having a physical copy of your tasks allows you to sort through them visually. In your brain, they’re all floating around with equal weight. On paper, they become concrete things that can be ordered and reordered.

2. Triage!

Which obligation is going to metaphorically bleed out and die if you don’t see to it immediately? Which one is an extremity that needs stitches, but not urgent? Assess which tasks need to be completed sooner than others based on time constraints.

3. Consider tasks based on value

If your long term goal is to get a certain grade in a class, then in general it makes sense to do the reading for that class consistently instead of hitting the gym every single day. But now and then you might really need a sweat sesh or an endorphin boost, and if that’s going to be more valuable by upping your mood and energy, it might be worth it to skim through that night’s reading.

4. Consider tasks based on effort

With tasks that have comparable value, estimate how much effort each task will require. Start with the more difficult task first. That way, when you’re losing steam, you’ll still be able to make it through the easier tasks leftover.

5. Accept the limitations of reality

There will be instances where you simply won’t be able to do everything on the list and something needs to go. After you’ve made your time and value estimates for your task list, eliminate the ones you know you can’t get to that day and give your all to the things you can.

I hope these prioritization tips help bring you balance and peace of mind in your pursuit of wellness, success, and happiness! Please share this chapter and these pointers with anyone you think might benefit from them. Though heavily modified from any canonical origin of the Buddha’s teachings, I do appreciate the popular quote, “Thousands of candles can be lighted from a single candle, and the life of the single candle will not be shortened. Happiness never decreases by being shared.” So it is with wellness. Sharing will never decrease your own. Go forth, share, flourish, and delight in your life!

http://powerlisting.wikia.com/wiki/Equilibrium_Manipulation

http://powerlisting.wikia.com/wiki/Equilibrium_Manipulation

By Sofia Lerner


Sofia Lerner is a Campus Clipper publishing intern who is studying English as a senior at NYU. Passionate about literature, dance, and wellness, Sofia aspires to help the arts thrive and help others pursue healthy lifestyles. For over 20 years, the Campus Clipper has been offering awesome student discounts in NYC,  from the East Side to Greenwich Village. Along with inspiration, the company offers students a special coupon booklet and the Official Student Guide, which encourage them to discover new places in the city and save money on food, clothing and services. 

At the Campus Clipper, not only do we help our interns learn new skills, make money, and create wonderful e-books, we give them a platform to teach others. Check our website for more student savings and watch our YouTube video showing off some of New York City’s finest students during the Welcome Week of 2015.

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Putting Effort into Your Appearance: It’s About Confidence, Not Vanity

Sunday, July 16th, 2017

Picture this: you’re having a rough day. Maybe your physics exam went horribly; maybe you and your significant other split up; maybe you struggle with anxiety or depression and it’s just worse than usual today. Self doubt and insecurity start to creep in, and your confidence sky dives. Cue sweat pants and a trip to the nearest bodega to check out the ice cream selection, and soon you’re a pile of distress, feeling… let’s just say not your most attractive.

https://twitter.com/ohh_deer

https://twitter.com/ohh_deer

Does this sound familiar? I think we’ve all been here. But even though your impulse is to crawl into a hole, and the last thing you want to do is put on nice clothes and style your hair, that’s exactly what you should do. Putting effort into your appearance makes you look more confident, which makes you feel more confident and act it too. Scientists Adam Hajo and Adam D. Galinsky research the effect that your style and clothing choices have on your mood, health, and overall confidence. This is the result of a phenomenon called “enclothed cognition.” In an article for the Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, Hajo and Galinsky explain that enclothed cognition “involves the co-occurrence of two independent factors — the symbolic meaning of the clothes and the physical experience of wearing them.” That means what you choose to put on has a real affect on how you feel and what your style and clothing are saying to the world.

https://twitter.com/fpjsprobinsyano

https://twitter.com/fpjsprobinsyano

In a Huffington Post article, “How Clothing Choices Affect and Reflect Your Self-Image,” Jill L. Ferguson quotes Karen J. Pine, a professor at the University of Hertfordshire (U.K.) and author of the book Mind What You Wear: The Psychology of Fashion. Pine maintains, “When we put on a piece of clothing we cannot help but adopt some of the characteristics associated with it, even if we are unaware of it.” Think about it: how do you feel and act in your favorite outfit? In sweatpants? After a haircut? What about wearing loafers? Heels? Gents, wearing a nice aftershave? I know that when I wear a fancy dress for a night out, I stand up straighter, walk with more intention, and probably project more confidence as a result. This isn’t to say you need to be dressed to the nines all the time. I love my flannel shirts and combat boots, and sometimes I feel more confident wearing that than wearing a form fitting dress (especially on a full stomach). Just a touch of something that spruces up your appearance can make a difference in how you feel, look, and present yourself. Often on days when I have to share my work in front of a group or have a difficult conversation, I’ll put on some lipstick, or as I call it, war paint.

https://www.redbubble.com

https://www.redbubble.com

I particularly like red, since it’s the color of confidence. I’ve always thought there’s just something about the classic red bottom on a pair of Louboutins that projects elegance and confidence. But that doesn’t mean you need to run around in heels on the daily. A few days a week I’ll spritz on some perfume, or wear a noticeable pair of earrings, style my hair differently, or brush on some mascara. These efforts don’t need to be head-to-toe 24/7. In the event of a break up, sometimes a dramatic change like a totally different haircut can do wonders to make you feel fresh and attractive; I just got a chop this weekend! But day-to-day, it’s just about putting in the effort to make yourself feel confident—and that’s inextricably linked to feeling attractive. So shine your shoes, try a new hair style, pull out that little black dress, and start wearing red!

By Sofia Lerner


Sofia Lerner is a Campus Clipper publishing intern who is studying English as a senior at NYU. Passionate about literature, dance, and wellness, Sofia aspires to help the arts thrive and help others pursue healthy lifestyles. For over 20 years, the Campus Clipper has been offering awesome student discounts in NYC,  from the East Side to Greenwich Village. Along with inspiration, the company offers students a special coupon booklet and the Official Student Guide, which encourage them to discover new places in the city and save money on food, clothing and services. 

At the Campus Clipper, not only do we help our interns learn new skills, make money, and create wonderful e-books, we give them a platform to teach others. Check our website for more student savings and watch our YouTube video showing off some of New York City’s finest students during the Welcome Week of 2015.


 

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Buy Yourself Flowers (Why You Should Plan Dates With Yourself)

Saturday, July 8th, 2017

You are your own main squeeze. Your relationship with yourself is the primary relationship you will have over the course of your life. People love to stress, “You must have a solid relationship with yourself to be capable of developing meaningful relationships with other other people.”And of course, they are right; you cannot pour from an empty cup. But that goes for everything else too, not just connections with other people. Your relationship with yourself informs how you tackle opportunities, handle challenges, approach work and play, and interpret the world you inhabit, because all of these things are tied to your sense of worth and self esteem. If that cup is empty, what will you be able to pour into your pursuits and interests? Your relationship with yourself is also the only one you are unequivocally guaranteed for your whole life, so you must enjoy spending time with yourself. If you can do that, you know someone will always be there to support and guide you when times are tough, and that someone is you. It means having someone to hang out with, whose company you enjoy. It means, in this big world where it’s easy to feel disconnected and alone—especially in New York—never being truly alone.

A few years ago I started buying myself flowers when I was feeling really down or something really big and exciting happened. I realized I didn’t need a guy to buy me flowers. I could go out to dinner alone. I could take walks by the river at sunset and sit in cafés and wander in bookstores. I could think of dates I’d want to go on and then just go do those things myself. And you know what happened? I got things done. I met some remarkable people. I grew exponentially. I flourished.

Self care, in the way we often talk about it, is a luxury. Spare cash for Lush bath bombs and spare time for people working 3 jobs—these are luxuries that many people don’t have. But dates don’t have to be constant, and planning them doesn’t have to mean breaking the bank. The goal is simply to create an experience now and then that makes you feel refreshed, loved, and worthy. So hang out with yourself; get to know yourself really, really freaking well. Show yourself some TLC. After all, you’re the person you’re stuck with till the end!

If you’re having trouble coming up with solo date ideas, here are some suggestions:

Make Yourself a Picnic to Enjoy by the Hudson River

Sunshine.  Soft grass. View of the water. Skyline. Benches. Need I say more?

https://www.timeout.com

https://www.timeout.com

Take a Candlelit Bubble Bath

This is easier if you’re in an apartment, since dorms don’t allow incendiary objects. The Kmart at Astor Place has a selection of cheap candles. You can also find some pretty reasonable ones at Michaels, or if you’re feeling a tad more extravagant, check out the yummy smells at one the many Ricky’s NYC stores. If you’re in a dorm, the right playlist will soothe your ears and help create the mood.

Smell the Flowers… Or Perfume
Speaking of smells, here’s one of my favorite pick-me-ups for when I’m down. Grab some fresh coffee beans (not required, but they add a nice touch), and head to Sephora. Indulge in smelling all the glorious scents, and take a whiff of the coffee beans between smells to clear your olfactory palate.

Visit the Botanical Garden at Prospect Heights

Admission is typically $15, but if you bring your ID it’s only $8 for students. The Brooklyn Botanic Garden website has a number of resources and information on events and activities, including a list of what is currently in bloom: https://www.bbg.org/bloom

https://www.nycgo.com/

https://www.nycgo.com/

Check Out a Museum

When you’re by yourself, you can stay for as long as you want or leave as soon as your feet get tired. No need to try and impress anyone with interpretations of artwork. Oh, and for students, they’re nearly all free. Hello Whitney, MoMA, and Met, to name a few.

http://whitney.org/

http://whitney.org/

Take in a Literary Reading

There are countless places in NYC to hear writers share their work. Check out KGB Bar in the East Village for a reading! Monday is poetry night, and if fiction is more your speed, stop in on a Sunday. See you there!

https://www.timeout.com

https://www.timeout.co

By Sofia Lerner

Sofia Lerner is a Campus Clipper publishing intern who is studying English as a senior at NYU. Passionate about literature, dance, and wellness, Sofia aspires to help the arts thrive and help others pursue healthy lifestyles. For over 20 years, the Campus Clipper has been offering awesome student discounts in NYC,  from the East Side to Greenwich Village. Along with inspiration, the company offers students a special coupon booklet and the Official Student Guide, which encourage them to discover new places in the city and save money on food, clothing and services. 

At the Campus Clipper, not only do we help our interns learn new skills, make money, and create wonderful e-books, we give them a platform to teach others. Check our website for more student savings and watch our YouTube video showing off some of New York City’s finest students during the Welcome Week of 2015.


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My Vegetarian Story

Tuesday, June 27th, 2017

Coming to university brings about changes in one’s character as well as in one’s way of thinking. For many, it is the first time we are living by ourselves, the first time we are in charge of every aspect of our everyday lives: from doing homework, to what we eat, to choosing to go to class, to deciding whether we brush our teeth. It is stressful to suddenly make this transition, but in my experience, it has made me all the more conscious of myself as a person, my needs and my desires. People tend to focus on different things, depending on who they are. When I came to university, I found that my focus was my relationship to food.

www.thepcrm.orga

www.thepcrm.orga

I had always enjoyed eating well. “Well” as in healthy and delicious, as my mother had taken up the task of teaching me about the effects of food on my health from a young age. Nonetheless, coming to university was the first time I became truly conscious of what I was putting into my body. I had always known that eating a salad was better than eating a cake, and I was aware of the benefits of each vegetable and food group, but the idea that what I was putting into my body impacted my being in such a strong way hadn’t settled in too much. You could say I was superficially aware of the importance of a good diet.

This all changed when I arrived in New York City and was forced to make all the choices myself. Perhaps this development sprung from having to cope with leaving my mother’s kitchen, where everything was cooked with the freshest Greek ingredients in a healthy way. To go from that to my school’s dining hall, whose salad bar was tasteless and whose prepared dishes all usually contained meat and ten times the amount of oil and/or butter necessary was a rude awakening.

www.oralanswers.com

www.oralanswers.com

I realized that since I was now in charge of myself, I soon had to be more conscious of what was in my disposition. Upon having this epiphany, I started watching documentaries and reading books on health. Soon enough, I realized that for who I am as a person, being healthy and aware of my nutrition meant giving up meat and a lot of dairy. I became convinced that a whole food, plant-based diet was the best thing I could do for myself. And surely enough, all the benefits people from the vegan community boast about became relevant for me too.

http://fattofitwwdiary.tumblr.com/post/71598319865/untitled-via-tumblr-on-we-heart-it

http://fattofitwwdiary.tumblr.com/post/71598319865/untitled-via-tumblr-on-we-heart-it

Most of the documentaries and books I read were targeted at people trying to make the switch to a vegan diet. Though I am not fully vegan, I am fully vegetarian and eat vegan about 70% of the time. I found that what resonated with me was not simply the health benefits of a whole foods diet, rather, the compassion the community argued for when it comes to animals. Adopting a whole food, plant-based diet was not only crucial for my health, as I felt my energy levels rise, my skin clear up, my hair get stronger and my mood improve, but it was also crucial for my sense of wellbeing and self-esteem.

After being exposed to the atrocity of what is the meat and dairy industry, I felt a lot of guilt when I engaged in activities which contributed to these disastrous causes. That’s when I realized that what I put into my body was not only important for my body’s health in regards to protein, carbohydrates, healthy fats, nutrients and minerals but also to my mind for the person I wanted to be. So, I made the choice to try to do my part for our planet and the animals and try to do the least “bad” I could. For me, it meant giving up meat completely and minimizing my dairy intake to only a few times per week (usually weekends).

www.lolwot.com

www.lolwot.com

I struggled with the idea that I wasn’t doing the most good I could. I told myself that my ultimate goal was to be completely vegan and in that way, be “perfect”. However, I soon realized that these thoughts were holding me back, as I was not seeing that what I was doing was already a positive change. What I realized was that there was no one way to eat and that actually, what was needed were people who were aware and determined to make the right choices most of the time. My lifestyle and diet were my way of reacting to the information I was given. Chances are, you will have a different experience, and it will not be better or worse than someone else’s, as long as you remember to show compassion and strive to be aware of your body to make the right choices, whichever they may be.

www.pinterest.com

www.pinterest.com

Interesting reads:

  • Eating Animals by Jonathan Safran Foer
  • Skinny Bitch by Rory Freedman and Kim Barnouin

Helpful documentaries:

  • Forks Over Knives
  • Cowspiracy
  • Food Matters
  • Food Choices

 

By Marina Theophanopoulou

__________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Marina Theophanopoulou is a Campus Clipper publishing intern who is studying Philosophy and Sociology as a junior at NYU. Passionate about healthy, food and wellness, Marina aspires to make others think of food in a more holistic way. For over 20 years, the Campus Clipper has been offering awesome student discounts in NYC,  from the East Side to Greenwich Village. Along with inspiration, the company offers students a special coupon booklet and the Official Student Guide, which encourage them to discover new places in the city and save money on food, clothing and services. 

At the Campus Clipper, not only do we help our interns learn new skills, make money, and create wonderful e-books, we give them a platform to teach others. Check our website for more student savings and watch our YouTube video showing off some of New York City’s finest students during the Welcome Week of 2015.

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5 Daily Ways to Check in with Yourself and Mentally Reset

Sunday, June 25th, 2017

Long days and frustrations at school or work can often leave us wishing we had a “reset” button in our brains. Whether we’re over-worked, stressed, annoyed, or just tired, a mental reboot is often much-needed, and while we don’t have an actual button for this, taking a few minutes to check in with yourself can go a long way. Here are a few things you can do to metaphorically hit your “reset” button.

https://be-nefit.co.uk/

https://be-nefit.co.uk/

1. Affect Labeling

Ask yourself how you’re feeling. Distracted? Anxious? Jittery? Insecure? The act of naming your emotions is called affect labeling, and it’s more powerful than you think. According to a 2007 study in the journal Psychological Science, “Affect labeling disrupts amygdala activity in response to affective stimuli.” That’s a mouthful. In normal-speak, here’s what researchers found: labeling emotions diminished the subjects’ responses to negative emotional images. Psychologists and wellness experts have long held that recognizing and naming our feelings diminishes their hold on us; this study simply provides the concrete evidence in the from neuroimaging—that is, images of brain activity.

Affect labeling reduces the passion and intensity of an emotion, returning us to a more rational state by allowing us to observe it instead of being overcome by it. So notice what you’re feeling. Maybe someone cut you off getting into the subway. Maybe you’re worried about a project. Are you over-caffeinated?Are you irritable because you’re hungry or didn’t sleep enough? Think beyond the basic categories of angry, sad, and happy, and try to label what you’re feeling as specifically as you can. I find this wheel of emotions very helpful:

http://inkwellideas.com/

http://inkwellideas.com/

2. Check in with your needs

When was the last time you ate? Washed your hair? Laughed? How’s your energy level? Last moment of physical contact with another human being? When you’re really deep into a project, an essay, or studying for an exam, it can be easy to forget your most basic needs. If you find yourself getting mentally fatigued, ask yourself if your baseline needs are in check. Maybe you need a walk around the block, a snack to boost glucose in your brain (i.e. fueling your study-power), or just a hug.

3. Progressive Muscle Relaxation

This technique is a winner for reducing anxiety and hitting the mental reset button. Using guided mental imagery, you methodically relax each muscle in your body. One of my teachers suggests visualizing a glowing light gliding along inside each part of your body. Follow these steps from The University of Rochester’s Medical Center to reset your mind with progressive muscle relaxation.

4. Come Back to Your Breath

For the duration of our stay here on Earth, the breath is always there. You don’t have to make an effort to breathe; it happens naturally. Take five minutes out of your day— especially if you’re having a tough one—and sit quietly with your breath. Notice your chest rising and falling, your belly expanding and deflating. The air entering your nostrils. Your tongue resting against the backs of your upper teeth. I like to imagine the shore of the ocean: The inhale is the sound of the water sliding back from the sand after each wave breaks, gathering and building up the next wave. The exhale is the wave breaking on the shore. Even just a few minutes of concentrated awareness of your breath will allow you to reset and return to your day refreshed. Try out this 5 minute guided breathing meditation from www.mindful.org.

http://www.betsymccallworks.com/

http://www.betsymccallworks.com/

5. Alone Time

There’s a difference between being alone due to circumstance, like when you’re walking to the subway, and actually scheduling alone time with yourself. It can be hard to get an accurate pulse on your mental state in the company of other people, so it’s highly valuable to spend some time alone every day. It provides a space to notice where your mind really is, and from there you can recenter it. Even the busiest student has ten minutes to tuck into their day for sitting and reflecting, taking a walk, writing in a journal, or engaging in any activity that allows your internal state to become a little clearer.

Use these tips to stay in tune with yourself and hit the mental reset button when you need to!


By Sofia Lerner

Sofia Lerner is a Campus Clipper publishing intern who is studying English as a senior at NYU. Passionate about literature, dance, and wellness, Sofia aspires to help the arts thrive and help others pursue healthy lifestyles. For over 20 years, the Campus Clipper has been offering awesome student discounts in NYC,  from the East Side to Greenwich Village. Along with inspiration, the company offers students a special coupon booklet and the Official Student Guide, which encourage them to discover new places in the city and save money on food, clothing and services. 

At the Campus Clipper, not only do we help our interns learn new skills, make money, and create wonderful e-books, we give them a platform to teach others. Check our website for more student savings and watch our YouTube video showing off some of New York City’s finest students during the Welcome Week of 2015.

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Finding a Meditative Practice that Works for You

Saturday, June 17th, 2017

Zillions of studies have been done on the benefits of mediation, from reducing stress and anxiety, to improving focus and mental performance, as well as decreasing the risk of some diseases and improving physical health. If you need a reason to try meditation, here’s a whopping list of 76 reasons. But… what if you hate meditating? For a lot of people, meditation is frustrating, difficult, or simply boring. If you’ve tried it and given up, or find the whole thing too “hippy dippy,” I have good news for you.

https://brunch.co.kr

https://brunch.co.kr

The heart of meditation is mindfulness, defined by https://www.mindful.org as “the basic human ability to be fully present, aware of where we are and what we’re doing, and not overly reactive or overwhelmed by what’s going on around us.” Often a mindfulness meditation may focus on the breath, for example, creating a deepened awareness of each inhalation and exhalation. But you can be “fully present, aware of where [you] are and what [you’re] doing with just about any activity, whether that activity is sitting and breathing, or running a 10k, or even just washing the dishes.

Do you have an activity where you get so absorbed in the present moment that you forget about everything else? Time, stress, to-do lists and other thoughts melt away? When I was a ballet dancer, the time spent at the ballet barre was a form of meditation to me. For that hour or so, nothing else in the world existed—often not even the other people in the room. There was only my body, my breath, and the steps I was executing, an awareness of every fiber in my body. Mindfulness is all about intention and really noticing rather than going through the motions. I had a postmodern dance teacher at NYU who introduced me to walking meditation, which has become one of my favorite meditative practices. It consists of focusing all your attention deeply on the supposedly simple act of walking. With eyes cast downward, about where the wall meets the floor, feet bare, and hands clasped gently behind your lower back, you walk. You notice how the weight shifts from your heel to the outer edge of your foot, to the ball of your foot with each step. The shift in your hips. Your spine. How you are holding your hands. The same kind of awareness might be achieved while taking a shower; really notice the sensation of warm water running over you, the scents of soap or shampoo.

http://www.ayurvedaplusworld.com/

http://www.ayurvedaplusworld.com/

If you are open to traditional meditation, but in small doses, try 5 minutes a day. Like anything else, you will at get better with practice! Ph.D. Emma M. Seppälä points out, in an article from Psychology Today, that there is a range of types of meditation, and one may work better for you than another. Dr. Seppälä includes in this range: Mindfulness Meditation, Effortless Meditation, Breathing Exercises, and Loving-Kindness Meditation. Mindfulness Meditation is based on “paying attention to sensations, feelings and thoughts in a non-judgmental way.” More “Effortless” forms of meditation might involve repeating mantras or being more unfocused to relax the mind. Breathing Exercises as a form of meditation have a wonderful impact on the nervous system, and Loving-Kindness meditation “focuses on developing feelings of goodwill, kindness and warmth towards others,” according to Seppälä.

Finally, if meditation is daunting or challenging, you may prefer a guided meditation. There are some wonderful apps out there to help guide you through a meditative practice. Experiment with Sattva, Calm, Headspace, The Mindfulness App, and Buddify to make your way toward a calmer, happier, healthier you!

ww.gauraastro.com

ww.gauraastro.com


By Sofia Lerner

Sofia Lerner is a Campus Clipper publishing intern who is studying English as a senior at NYU. Passionate about literature, dance, and wellness, Sofia aspires to help the arts thrive and help others pursue healthy lifestyles. For over 20 years, the Campus Clipper has been offering awesome student discounts in NYC,  from the East Side to Greenwich Village. Along with inspiration, the company offers students a special coupon booklet and the Official Student Guide, which encourage them to discover new places in the city and save money on food, clothing and services. 

At the Campus Clipper, not only do we help our interns learn new skills, make money, and create wonderful e-books, we give them a platform to teach others. Check our website for more student savings and watch our YouTube video showing off some of New York City’s finest students during the Welcome Week of 2015.


 

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How to Eat Well and Plan Meals on a Budget

Saturday, June 10th, 2017

When it comes to NYC living, one of the trickiest things for many students to figure out is food. If you’re not on a meal plan, it can be challenging to feed yourself without eating out all the time and bleeding your wallet dry. It’s also hard to make consistently healthy choices about food when you’re surrounded by convenient temptations. My first year at NYU, I fluctuated between forgetting to eat for 19 hours while buried in books, and stuffing my face with junk food. Now, in my senior year, I still have friends who make pasta every night because it’s easy and affordable. Pasta is delicious. I could easily eat my weight in farfelle or linguine, especially slathered in pesto, and the way to my heart is By CHLOE’s mac and cheese. But pasta is also not a balanced meal for every night, and there are a million affordable eats you can make to supplement your college-student-pasta-diet. Here are some of the quick and dirty tips I’ve learned for eating healthy and affordably as a student in New York:

Artist Marta Spendowska, https://www.behance.net

Artist Marta Spendowska, https://www.behance.net

Prep Your Meals

Planning for the week ahead is the single best thing you can do to manage what goes into your body and prevent over-spending. Pick a day for meal prep; I like to do this on Saturday so I can spend all of Sunday focusing on assignments. Decide what you’re going to make for that week, or at least the next few days, and then: 1. pre-chop all veggies and proteins 2. cook a whole lot of food and store it in the fridge. I usually make a huge batch of salad for the week and store it in plastic produce bags. I also chop vegetables and tofu (and in the past, chicken) in advance for things to make later in the week like stir-fry, which is super easy and healthy. Then, when it’s midweek and you’re exhausted, all you have to do is transfer from tupperware to pan and have a hot meal in moments. And if you make a big batch, which I recommend, you’ll have leftovers to microwave. Future you will thank you.

Trader Joe’s is Your Friend

No place in this city seems to have it all, but Trader Joe’s does have some of the best prices compared to other grocery stores. I’m a big fan of their trail mixes, name brand Greek yogurt, and New Mexico Piñon coffee. For leafy greens and other veggies, Whole Foods tends to have better quality produce. As for fruit, don’t be afraid to stop at one of the street vendor carts! They’re well-priced, and usually very good quality. I’ll often grab a banana for about 60 cents on my way to class in the morning, and one of the best peaches I ever had came from a sidewalk fruit vendor.

Affordable Proteins

Meat is usually the most expensive part of a meal. A 2014 article from http://health.usnews.com/ states that in 2014 pork averaged $3.90 per pound, while ground beef averaged $3.27 and choice steak cost about $6.86 per pound. Boneless chicken breasts were an average of $3.27 per pound nationwide. Meanwhile tofu averaged $2 to $2.50 per pound, and beans are even cheaper. Bean salads and tofu have become staples of my diet, and recently I’ve been learning how to cook tempeh. Experiment with tofu marinades, and try some of these recipes!

http://www.myrecipes.com/

http://www.myrecipes.com/

Baked Garlic Tofu

Crispy Tofu & Broccoli

Tofu Scramble

I’m also all about protein-packed shakes and smoothies. Stock up on cocoa powder, peanut butter, frozen fruits, and protein powder! Click here for smoothie inspiration.

http://naturalchow.com/

http://naturalchow.com/

Frozen Foods

Speaking of frozen fruit, if you have the joy that is freezer space, use the heck out of it! Frozen veggies are often cheaper than fresh produce. I love adding green beans, carrots, corn, and peas into brown rice or quinoa to squeeze a few more vegetables into a meal, and Trader Joe’s frozen succotash is a great mix in. For breakfast, try frozen waffles (toasted) with peanut butter, a drizzle of honey or maple syrup, and a sprinkle of sesame seeds on top. TJ’s also has some lifesaver frozen meals if you need something instant during finals. Stock up on Amy’s Chili for microwavable salvation. You won’t even notice it’s vegan.

Snack Packs

If, like me, you need something to much on while studying, try plain unbuttered popcorn or carrots and hummus. For when you’re on the move, keep snacks on hand to avoid binging or spending when hunger strikes. Fill sandwich bags with almonds and apricots or popcorn sprinkled with curry powder. Grab one of these to put in your bag before leaving home. Babybel cheeses are also great to keep in your bag. So are bananas!  Goofy as it is, consider a Banana Saver: http://bit.ly/2r4Jdhw. Best gift I’ve ever received (thanks, Mom & Dad).

Happy munching, everyone!


By Sofia Lerner

Sofia Lerner is a Campus Clipper publishing intern who is studying English as a senior at NYU. Passionate about literature, dance, and wellness, Sofia aspires to help the arts thrive and help others pursue healthy lifestyles. For over 20 years, the Campus Clipper has been offering awesome student discounts in NYC,  from the East Side to Greenwich Village. Along with inspiration, the company offers students a special coupon booklet and the Official Student Guide, which encourage them to discover new places in the city and save money on food, clothing and services. 

At the Campus Clipper, not only do we help our interns learn new skills, make money, and create wonderful e-books, we give them a platform to teach others. Check our website for more student savings and watch our YouTube video showing off some of New York City’s finest students during the Welcome Week of 2015.


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5 Steps to Better Sleep

Wednesday, May 31st, 2017

You’ve been awake since 8—maybe 6 or 7 if you had an early class, or practice, or were finishing up that assignment at the last minute—barely making it through the day on coffee and willpower. After getting through the readings and problem sets for tomorrow, finally you can nestle into your comforter and drift into sweet unconsciousness… until it’s time to wake up and do it all over again. Is that French quiz tomorrow, or the day after? Why does your phone keep buzzing? Did you remember to put your presentation notecards in your bag? How are you still awake? Before you know it, an hour has slipped by, and you’re still not asleep.

sleeping beauty

Image Credit: www.bustle.com

Often, trying to balance school, work, relationships, chores, and hobbies, getting enough sleep becomes one of those things we know we should do, but don’t. In the chaos of college life, it falls to the wayside. But if you won’t listen to your mother, at least listen to what I’ve gleaned from The National Institute of Health, the American Psychological Association, and the Division of Sleep Medicine at Harvard Medical School: sleep is crucial to your physical health, judgment, decision making, memory consolidation and learning, mood, mental health, and emotional well being. The term “sleep hygiene” is defined by the National Sleep Foundation (NSF) as “a variety of different practices and habits that are necessary to have good nighttime sleep quality and full daytime alertness.” Sounds like a good investment, right? Fortunately, better sleep does not have to mean upending your lifestyle or breaking the bank. Here are 6 simple, easy ways to take care of yourself by improving your sleep hygiene:

https://puurvangeluk.com/2016/05/19/beste-tijdstip-om-naar-bed-te-gaan/

Image Credit: https://puurvangeluk.com

1. Respect the Circadian Rhythm

Your circadian rhythm is concerned with “physical, mental and behavioral changes that follow a 24-hour cycle, responding primarily to light and darkness,” according to the National Institute of General Medical Sciences. Going to bed and waking up at the same time every day help regulate your internal clock. Another important factor to keep in mind, if you spend long hours in the library like I do, is to get sunlight during the day and keep your room dark at night. See if you can get some of your reading done in the park early in the day.

2. Wind Down

Give yourself some time at the end of the day to de-stress and mentally prepare for bed. Meditate, write in a journal, do breathing exercises or gentle Yin yoga poses. If that’s too hippie-dippie for you, take a soothing shower, write down your to-do’s so you’re not worrying about remembering them once you’re in bed, listen to music, or have a small cup of camomile tea at least an hour before going to sleep. That said, drinking too much of anything close to bedtime will result in a trip to the bathroom, making it hard to fall back asleep. Try to limit your intake at least an hour before getting into bed.

3. No electronics!

Maybe you use the app Flux on your computer, and you turn on “Night Shift” on your smartphone, but these gadgets still disrupt sleep. According to sleep.org, these devices interfere with your circadian rhythm by suppressing melatonin. They keep your brain alert and prevent you from falling sleep, and the notification tones can keep you up too. If you’re like me and use your phone as your alarm clock, try wrapping up your gadget usage at least an hour before bed, put your phone on silent (yes, the alarm will still go off), and leave your phone out of reach, face down so that the light won’t disturb you if you do get a notification.

4. Exercise

I’m not here to tell you to “tone your abs,” “bulk up,” “slim down,” or any related BS. I am here to tell you that regular aerobic exercise— even 20 minutes of cycling or brisk walking—can help you sleep better. A NSF study in the journal Mental Health and Physical Activity showed that “150 minutes of moderate to vigorous activity a week, which is the national guideline, provided a 65 percent improvement in sleep quality.” Why not go for a walk or a jog to get your daily dose of sunshine at the same time?

5. No Caffeine 6 Hours Before Bed

You’ve heard caffeine can affect sleep, but maybe not the full extent of its effects. According to a 2013 study in the Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine, caffeine consumed even 6 hours before bedtime can have adverse effects on the quality of your sleep. If you’re really attached to your coffee, stick to decaf later in the day.

Use these tips to improve your sleep, your health, and ultimately your happiness. Go forth and slumber!

snoopy

Image Credit: www.flickr.com


By Sofia Lerner

Sofia Lerner is a Campus Clipper publishing intern who is studying English as a senior at NYU. Passionate about literature, dance, and wellness, Sofia aspires to help the arts thrive and help others pursue healthy lifestyles. For over 20 years, the Campus Clipper has been offering awesome student discounts in NYC,  from the East Side to Greenwich Village. Along with inspiration, the company offers students a special coupon booklet and the Official Student Guide, which encourage them to discover new places in the city and save money on food, clothing and services. 

At the Campus Clipper, not only do we help our interns learn new skills, make money, and create wonderful e-books, we give them a platform to teach others. Check our website for more student savings and watch our YouTube video showing off some of New York City’s finest students during the Welcome Week of 2015.

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Positive Programming

Wednesday, June 15th, 2011

In my last article I talked about the influence of my parents’ education on my education choices. Though aware for some time how much they influenced me, the totality of that influence didn’t sink in until I wrote “Going Your Own Way“. I discovered, despite all of the effort I had put in to deprogramming myself from making choices simply to stay on my parents good side, I have a long way to go in becoming my own person.
Being stuck in your parents belief systems can happen for any number of reasons. First, you can be born into a very strict family and have parents who believe there is only one “right” way of seeing the world and only one way life must be approached. Second, you could have parents, like mine, who push you to do your best in school while neglecting the encouragement of yourself as an individual, especially when you disagree with them. Third, you might have  grown up in a family where there is little or no access to outside opinions or viewpoints, or had parents that only encourage you to follow in their footsteps. This is by no means an exhaustive list, but it should get you thinking. What beliefs do you act out, even when they don’t benefit you?
Today, make a list of every action you performed. At the end of the day, go over the list see if you can uncover your motivation for each action. What made you hold the door (or not) for the person behind you? What made you opt for a fast cheap lunch instead of something a little more expensive, but healthier? Don’t get too bogged down in details; this is just a quick list of your actions and motivations. Star any actions or attitudes you want to change or remove from your life. Move down the page quickly–don’t let this exercise turn into a guilt trip. You are simply taking the time to feel the stirrings of your true self as you quickly pick out what you don’t like to do or think. After going over the list, put it an an envelope marked “My Road to Improvement.”

You have now planted the idea in your mind that your subconscious actions and attitudes can and should change for the better. Although there are certain things you can’t avoid, like studying for that big test, you at least know there are other aspects of yourself you can control. Pull out your list during the weekend or any day in which you have set aside personal time (if you haven’t, pick a date and time now!). This is important, because although you might want to rush into your leisure activities, dedicating even a little of your free time towards self-improvement will make you more feel much more positive overall. In this way, you show yourself how important your mental and emotional well-being is.

Take a look at the actions you have starred. What makes you dislike performing those actions? Choose one and write at least a paragraph on where the habit comes from and why you’d like it to change. Be honest but gentle with yourself; now is not the time to be critical. If you notice your impulse to perform the action comes from a source outside yourself you don’t agree with, write another paragraph about how to turn the old idea into a more positive form of motivation.

For example, if you’ve discovered you purchase items you don’t need because you are unhappy, write about how you think you began this practice. Again, be honest. Any action performed to shift attention away from an unhappy situation instead of dealing with it should be resolved immediately. End your paragraph(s) with an affirmative statement: “Whenever I feel upset about a situation I cannot fully control, I will work on resolving my feelings on the issue.” Remember, this is an affirmation, no “can’ts, won’ts, or don’ts” should be allowed in your statement. Practice being more positive with yourself everyday and record your progress; your habits and thinking will change much faster with positive encouragement.

Think big!

There are many aspects of college life which would benefit from using positive affirmations. Start each morning with at least one affirmation about how productive and promising of a student you are. For added emphasis, state your affirmation(s) while looking into a mirror. This will help solidify the ties between the statement your making and yourself. Vary your routine and seek out new positive experiences. Get inspired at stores like Namaste which offer an eclectic array of books on self-improvement.

Evelyn Oluwole

Image Credit: alistairpott.com, amazingmusings.com

Interested in seeing more of my work? Please visit my personal blog here.

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