Archive for the ‘Eating Healthy’ Category

What cooking is for me, and what it can be for you too

Tuesday, July 18th, 2017

As you have probably understood so far, I value my relationship with food more than the next person, but what I value even more is the time I spend preparing my food. While living at home I was lucky enough, in many ways, to have food ready for me waiting on the table as I got back from school. Though at the time it was the best way I could have imagined things, I had no idea how passionate I would become about preparing my own food daily.

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It’s common to see cooking as a chore, and in many ways, it can be. I’m sure that after a day of very hard work when one gets home in time for dinner, the last thing one wants to do is actually have to spend a significant amount of time cooking. However, in my everyday life, I’ve found that instead of dreading the times of day when I have to cook, I actually look forward to them. Not only am I happy during the process of cooking but I’m also proud of what I’ve ended up creating. For me, cooking has become, an escape, a time to relax, and a way to feel a small sense of accomplishment throughout the day. You could even say that it has become a small way for me to meditate…

 

I definitely benefit from my small cooking ritual, and I think if you follow the following steps you might too:

 

  • The Environment

 

First things first, the most important factor is always the environment. Obviously, if we all had amazing, huge, well-lit, chef-worthy kitchens, we would probably all enjoy cooking more. Nonetheless, there are a few things you can do to make your dorm’s or small student apartment’s kitchen more enjoyable. For starters, lighting is key, so if you can, invest in making your kitchen well lit. Next, I’d suggest getting a few good basic appliances, pots and pans to make your cooking struggles easier. Lastly, the miscellaneous but -oh so- important things will make a world of difference: some plants (extra points if they are basil, coriander or mint), some cute kitchen towels as well as oven mitts, and some fun fridge magnets or maybe some pictures on the wall. After you’ve set up your kitchen, it is your job to keep it that way, by cleaning and making it an environment you want to stay in.

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  • Your Ingredients

 

Secondly, as any good chef will tell you: good ingredients make the best dishes. I’d suggest finding a store you like, getting familiar with it, and making it a habit of going to shop there for your groceries. In time, shopping for groceries will stop being a hassle and will instead become a peaceful time, in a known environment, without all the frustration it can sometimes have. Furthermore, ensuring you have high quality ingredients every time will show in your final product, which will, in the long term, benefit you greatly, both in your health and wellbeing. One of my favorite places to shop at is Lifesum Market, on 6th avenue and 8th street. I love it, as it is close to campus and my apartment, but most importantly because it carries only organic produce and packaged items. Another crucial factor which makes Lifesum one of my favorite stores is the discount I get from the Campus Clipper.

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  • Your Motivation

 

Another key factor in improving your relationship with your kitchen is having real reasons why you want to do so. That is, you have to get educated and understand the benefits of cooking your own food. By knowing what goes inside your food you are in charge of your health and thus in charge of one, if not, the biggest parts of your life. Furthermore, in the long term, by incorporating meal prepping and some money saving hacks, you’ll see how cooking can be very cost effective, helping you adhere to your student budget. Or, if you’re like me, you’ll even find a peaceful escape in cooking, which helps you reboot during the day. Whatever the reason, finding your motivation is key in succeeding.

 

  • The Inspiration

 

After you’ve managed all three previous steps, it is time to get inspired. This means that it’s time to find what exactly you want to make and what gets you most excited to create in your own safe space, in your own way. Finding inspiration is key, as it will take cooking from being a chore to becoming a fun way to pass the time, to be creative and to feel a sense of accomplishment. My grandfather used to say that anyone who likes to eat will eventually know how to cook. So, find what you like to eat and make it for yourself. I suggest getting a few cookbooks that look appealing to you, but have recipes anyone can execute. Or, if you like, you could spend hours, as I do, on websites, blogs and YouTube looking at all the wonderful things people manage to made with just a handful of ingredients. The only thing I am certain of, is that somewhere out there, there is something that you’d love to make again, or make your way, so find it and get cooking.

cook

  • Relaxation

 

Above all, as always, what is more important is that you stay relaxed. If you actually get into cooking and find some enjoyment in it, don’t worry if all you have time to make that day is a grilled cheese sandwich. Any type of food is fuel, but the best fuel is the food you make yourself. Don’t be too hard on yourself when you don’t make something great or if it’s the 10th time you’ve made spaghetti and you still make them mushy. Try to appreciate the fact that you’re trying to do something that is good for you. Every moment that you spend in your kitchen, trying to make something healthy for your body is a moment that you spend showing love for yourself and your body.

 

 

By Marina Theophanopoulou

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Marina Theophanopoulou is a Campus Clipper publishing intern who is studying Philosophy and Sociology as a junior at NYU. Passionate about healthy, food and wellness, Marina aspires to make others think of food in a more holistic way. For over 20 years, the Campus Clipper has been offering awesome student discounts in NYC,  from the East Side to Greenwich Village. Along with inspiration, the company offers students a special coupon booklet and the Official Student Guide, which encourage them to discover new places in the city and save money on food, clothing and services. 

At the Campus Clipper, not only do we help our interns learn new skills, make money, and create wonderful e-books, we give them a platform to teach others. Check our website for more student savings and watch our YouTube video showing off some of New York City’s finest students during the Welcome Week of 2015.

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My Vegetarian Story

Tuesday, June 27th, 2017

Coming to university brings about changes in one’s character as well as in one’s way of thinking. For many, it is the first time we are living by ourselves, the first time we are in charge of every aspect of our everyday lives: from doing homework, to what we eat, to choosing to go to class, to deciding whether we brush our teeth. It is stressful to suddenly make this transition, but in my experience, it has made me all the more conscious of myself as a person, my needs and my desires. People tend to focus on different things, depending on who they are. When I came to university, I found that my focus was my relationship to food.

www.thepcrm.orga

www.thepcrm.orga

I had always enjoyed eating well. “Well” as in healthy and delicious, as my mother had taken up the task of teaching me about the effects of food on my health from a young age. Nonetheless, coming to university was the first time I became truly conscious of what I was putting into my body. I had always known that eating a salad was better than eating a cake, and I was aware of the benefits of each vegetable and food group, but the idea that what I was putting into my body impacted my being in such a strong way hadn’t settled in too much. You could say I was superficially aware of the importance of a good diet.

This all changed when I arrived in New York City and was forced to make all the choices myself. Perhaps this development sprung from having to cope with leaving my mother’s kitchen, where everything was cooked with the freshest Greek ingredients in a healthy way. To go from that to my school’s dining hall, whose salad bar was tasteless and whose prepared dishes all usually contained meat and ten times the amount of oil and/or butter necessary was a rude awakening.

www.oralanswers.com

www.oralanswers.com

I realized that since I was now in charge of myself, I soon had to be more conscious of what was in my disposition. Upon having this epiphany, I started watching documentaries and reading books on health. Soon enough, I realized that for who I am as a person, being healthy and aware of my nutrition meant giving up meat and a lot of dairy. I became convinced that a whole food, plant-based diet was the best thing I could do for myself. And surely enough, all the benefits people from the vegan community boast about became relevant for me too.

http://fattofitwwdiary.tumblr.com/post/71598319865/untitled-via-tumblr-on-we-heart-it

http://fattofitwwdiary.tumblr.com/post/71598319865/untitled-via-tumblr-on-we-heart-it

Most of the documentaries and books I read were targeted at people trying to make the switch to a vegan diet. Though I am not fully vegan, I am fully vegetarian and eat vegan about 70% of the time. I found that what resonated with me was not simply the health benefits of a whole foods diet, rather, the compassion the community argued for when it comes to animals. Adopting a whole food, plant-based diet was not only crucial for my health, as I felt my energy levels rise, my skin clear up, my hair get stronger and my mood improve, but it was also crucial for my sense of wellbeing and self-esteem.

After being exposed to the atrocity of what is the meat and dairy industry, I felt a lot of guilt when I engaged in activities which contributed to these disastrous causes. That’s when I realized that what I put into my body was not only important for my body’s health in regards to protein, carbohydrates, healthy fats, nutrients and minerals but also to my mind for the person I wanted to be. So, I made the choice to try to do my part for our planet and the animals and try to do the least “bad” I could. For me, it meant giving up meat completely and minimizing my dairy intake to only a few times per week (usually weekends).

www.lolwot.com

www.lolwot.com

I struggled with the idea that I wasn’t doing the most good I could. I told myself that my ultimate goal was to be completely vegan and in that way, be “perfect”. However, I soon realized that these thoughts were holding me back, as I was not seeing that what I was doing was already a positive change. What I realized was that there was no one way to eat and that actually, what was needed were people who were aware and determined to make the right choices most of the time. My lifestyle and diet were my way of reacting to the information I was given. Chances are, you will have a different experience, and it will not be better or worse than someone else’s, as long as you remember to show compassion and strive to be aware of your body to make the right choices, whichever they may be.

www.pinterest.com

www.pinterest.com

Interesting reads:

  • Eating Animals by Jonathan Safran Foer
  • Skinny Bitch by Rory Freedman and Kim Barnouin

Helpful documentaries:

  • Forks Over Knives
  • Cowspiracy
  • Food Matters
  • Food Choices

 

By Marina Theophanopoulou

__________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Marina Theophanopoulou is a Campus Clipper publishing intern who is studying Philosophy and Sociology as a junior at NYU. Passionate about healthy, food and wellness, Marina aspires to make others think of food in a more holistic way. For over 20 years, the Campus Clipper has been offering awesome student discounts in NYC,  from the East Side to Greenwich Village. Along with inspiration, the company offers students a special coupon booklet and the Official Student Guide, which encourage them to discover new places in the city and save money on food, clothing and services. 

At the Campus Clipper, not only do we help our interns learn new skills, make money, and create wonderful e-books, we give them a platform to teach others. Check our website for more student savings and watch our YouTube video showing off some of New York City’s finest students during the Welcome Week of 2015.

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How to Eat Well and Plan Meals on a Budget

Saturday, June 10th, 2017

When it comes to NYC living, one of the trickiest things for many students to figure out is food. If you’re not on a meal plan, it can be challenging to feed yourself without eating out all the time and bleeding your wallet dry. It’s also hard to make consistently healthy choices about food when you’re surrounded by convenient temptations. My first year at NYU, I fluctuated between forgetting to eat for 19 hours while buried in books, and stuffing my face with junk food. Now, in my senior year, I still have friends who make pasta every night because it’s easy and affordable. Pasta is delicious. I could easily eat my weight in farfelle or linguine, especially slathered in pesto, and the way to my heart is By CHLOE’s mac and cheese. But pasta is also not a balanced meal for every night, and there are a million affordable eats you can make to supplement your college-student-pasta-diet. Here are some of the quick and dirty tips I’ve learned for eating healthy and affordably as a student in New York:

Artist Marta Spendowska, https://www.behance.net

Artist Marta Spendowska, https://www.behance.net

Prep Your Meals

Planning for the week ahead is the single best thing you can do to manage what goes into your body and prevent over-spending. Pick a day for meal prep; I like to do this on Saturday so I can spend all of Sunday focusing on assignments. Decide what you’re going to make for that week, or at least the next few days, and then: 1. pre-chop all veggies and proteins 2. cook a whole lot of food and store it in the fridge. I usually make a huge batch of salad for the week and store it in plastic produce bags. I also chop vegetables and tofu (and in the past, chicken) in advance for things to make later in the week like stir-fry, which is super easy and healthy. Then, when it’s midweek and you’re exhausted, all you have to do is transfer from tupperware to pan and have a hot meal in moments. And if you make a big batch, which I recommend, you’ll have leftovers to microwave. Future you will thank you.

Trader Joe’s is Your Friend

No place in this city seems to have it all, but Trader Joe’s does have some of the best prices compared to other grocery stores. I’m a big fan of their trail mixes, name brand Greek yogurt, and New Mexico Piñon coffee. For leafy greens and other veggies, Whole Foods tends to have better quality produce. As for fruit, don’t be afraid to stop at one of the street vendor carts! They’re well-priced, and usually very good quality. I’ll often grab a banana for about 60 cents on my way to class in the morning, and one of the best peaches I ever had came from a sidewalk fruit vendor.

Affordable Proteins

Meat is usually the most expensive part of a meal. A 2014 article from http://health.usnews.com/ states that in 2014 pork averaged $3.90 per pound, while ground beef averaged $3.27 and choice steak cost about $6.86 per pound. Boneless chicken breasts were an average of $3.27 per pound nationwide. Meanwhile tofu averaged $2 to $2.50 per pound, and beans are even cheaper. Bean salads and tofu have become staples of my diet, and recently I’ve been learning how to cook tempeh. Experiment with tofu marinades, and try some of these recipes!

http://www.myrecipes.com/

http://www.myrecipes.com/

Baked Garlic Tofu

Crispy Tofu & Broccoli

Tofu Scramble

I’m also all about protein-packed shakes and smoothies. Stock up on cocoa powder, peanut butter, frozen fruits, and protein powder! Click here for smoothie inspiration.

http://naturalchow.com/

http://naturalchow.com/

Frozen Foods

Speaking of frozen fruit, if you have the joy that is freezer space, use the heck out of it! Frozen veggies are often cheaper than fresh produce. I love adding green beans, carrots, corn, and peas into brown rice or quinoa to squeeze a few more vegetables into a meal, and Trader Joe’s frozen succotash is a great mix in. For breakfast, try frozen waffles (toasted) with peanut butter, a drizzle of honey or maple syrup, and a sprinkle of sesame seeds on top. TJ’s also has some lifesaver frozen meals if you need something instant during finals. Stock up on Amy’s Chili for microwavable salvation. You won’t even notice it’s vegan.

Snack Packs

If, like me, you need something to much on while studying, try plain unbuttered popcorn or carrots and hummus. For when you’re on the move, keep snacks on hand to avoid binging or spending when hunger strikes. Fill sandwich bags with almonds and apricots or popcorn sprinkled with curry powder. Grab one of these to put in your bag before leaving home. Babybel cheeses are also great to keep in your bag. So are bananas!  Goofy as it is, consider a Banana Saver: http://bit.ly/2r4Jdhw. Best gift I’ve ever received (thanks, Mom & Dad).

Happy munching, everyone!


By Sofia Lerner

Sofia Lerner is a Campus Clipper publishing intern who is studying English as a senior at NYU. Passionate about literature, dance, and wellness, Sofia aspires to help the arts thrive and help others pursue healthy lifestyles. For over 20 years, the Campus Clipper has been offering awesome student discounts in NYC,  from the East Side to Greenwich Village. Along with inspiration, the company offers students a special coupon booklet and the Official Student Guide, which encourage them to discover new places in the city and save money on food, clothing and services. 

At the Campus Clipper, not only do we help our interns learn new skills, make money, and create wonderful e-books, we give them a platform to teach others. Check our website for more student savings and watch our YouTube video showing off some of New York City’s finest students during the Welcome Week of 2015.


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Showing Love by Taking Care of Your Health and Time For Yourself

Friday, April 14th, 2017

 “you deserve to be

completely found

in your surroundings

not lost within them”

-Rupi Kaur

There is no questioning the fact that keeping our health in check and taking time out of our busy lives to take care of ourselves physically and mentally are great ways to show ourselves some love. When we put effort into taking care of our bodies in various ways, we are sure to feel the best about ourselves.

Remember my friend, Ashley? We’re traveling together this week for our Spring Break, but, unfortunately, she was unable to get a pedicure with me this time! So I asked another friend, and we used our Campus Clipper coupon booklets to show ourselves some self-love! We used the below coupon to go to QQ Nails & Spa on 8th Avenue here in the city! 

 

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Both my friend and I are seniors graduating in less than two months, and, needless to say, we are feeling the stress and anxiety as we get closer to graduation. Not having jobs or apartments secured for afterward is simply frightening. That said, we both felt great when we took the time out of our schedules to get our nails done and simply relax. Clearing your mind and spending quality time either alone or with a good friend can be incredibly beneficial to your overall wellbeing.

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If you love getting your nails done or any sort of spa treatment and you love student discounts just as much, then follow the above link for the coupon and try QQ for yourself! All of the staff was friendly, our nails turned out great, and we even got complimentary massages! We will definitely be returning to take advantage of the loyalty program!

If this isn’t really your thing, then find out what is and take the time to do what you love in order to take care of yourself.

Something else that is important is ensuring that you’re putting effort into trying to maintain good health by working out, eating nutritious foods, and visiting your doctors and health professionals regularly.

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My roommates and I love to make smoothies, especially after a workout. Making ourselves go to the gym always helps us feel better afterwards and trying to eat foods that will feed our bodies in the best ways gives us the boosts we need each day! While I love a good smoothie and pack tons of different ingredients into that NutriBullet, I never forget to splurge and give into my cravings either-what’s life without a little fun!?

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So, I encourage you to seek out more ways to continuously take care of your mental and physical health. Find what works for you and what helps you feel good and stick to it. If you can, use a coupon in the Campus Clipper booklet to make it that much better, too! Take the time to relax when life becomes too overwhelming, even if it is only a few deep breaths. When you begin to consciously take the time to put yourself first, you will find that you can love yourself more.

By Chanelle Surphlis


Chanelle Surphlis is a Campus Clipper publishing intern, who is graduating from FIT this May. Passionate about giving back and pursuing volunteer opportunities, Chanelle aspires to work for a fashion or beauty company that includes philanthropy in its core values. If you like Chanelle’s writing, check out her blogs here and here. We have the most talented interns ever and we’re so proud of them! For over 20 years, the Campus Clipper has been offering awesome student discounts in NYC,  from the East Side to Greenwich Village. Along with inspiration, the company offers students a special coupon booklet and the Official Student Guide, which encourage them to discover new places in the city and save money on food, clothing and services.  

At the Campus Clipper, not only do we help our interns learn new skills, make money, and create wonderful e-books, we give them a platform to teach others. Check our website for more student savings and watch our YouTube video showing off some of New York City’s finest students during the Welcome Week of 2015. 

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Make Your Own Sushi: Sushi For The Festive

Saturday, April 1st, 2017
Image Credit: https://www.japancentre.com/en/recipes/1369-flower-shaped-sushi-roll

Image Credit: https://www.japancentre.com/en/recipes/1369-flower-shaped-sushi-roll

One of the great things about sushi is that it often has many colorful ingredients, and this can make it a beautiful and festive dish. Making sushi like this is a little more difficult than the previous recipes, but the added effort makes the presentation positively gorgeous!

To start, we’ll begin like we would with a standard roll of sushi. Tear a strip off your sheet of seaweed, then spread the rice over it, as usual. The ingredients will be wrapped in seaweed this time, to add a nice decorative effect (you’ll need two sheets of seaweed for this recipe). We’ll be making a design of a flower, so you’ll want a few differently colored ingredients. For this recipe, we’ll use crab meat (or imitation crab meat), carrot, and avocado; however, since this recipe is based on color and presentation, feel free to deviate from it and use any other colorful ingredients you like!

Spread the seasoned rice on the first sheet of seaweed, leaving, as always, a border on both the top and bottom edges. Wrap each of the ingredient strips with strips of the second sheet of seaweed, then line one strip of crab meat and one strip of carrot on top of the rice. Leave a little space between them, then lay the avocado strip on top of the other ingredients. Pull the seaweed layer to the edge of the bamboo mat with your thumb and forefinger, and begin to roll it together. Before you finish rolling, however, lay the remaining strip of crab meat and the strip of carrot on top of the avocado, and hold in place with your other three fingers. Carefully roll the rest of the sushi together, and gently press together. When you cut the sushi open, you should end up with a simple flower shape in each piece of sushi. Arrange the sushi on a dish and dazzle your friends!


This is the tenth and final chapter from an e-book by one of the Campus Clipper’s former publishing interns, who wrote about how to make sushi. Follow our blog for more chapters from this e-book. We have the most talented interns ever and we’re so proud of them! For over 20 years, the Campus Clipper has been offering awesome student discounts in NYC,  from the East Side to Greenwich Village. Along with inspiration, the company offers students a special coupon booklet and the Official Student Guide, which encourage them to discover new places in the city and save money on food, clothing and services.  

At the Campus Clipper, not only do we help our interns learn new skills, make money, and create wonderful e-books, we give them a platform to teach others. Check our website for more student savings and watch our YouTube video showing off some of New York City’s finest students during the Welcome Week of 2015.

Become a fan on Facebook and follow us on Twitter and Instagram

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Make Your Own Sushi: Sushi on a Budget

Saturday, March 25th, 2017
Image Credit: http://fruitguys.com/almanac/2011/05/05/roll-your-own-how-to-make-vegetarian-sushi

Image Credit: http://fruitguys.com/almanac/2011/05/05/roll-your-own-how-to-make-vegetarian-sushi

Although sushi is simple and delicious, it sometimes requires ingredients that can be a little on the expensive side. Luckily, there are alternative, less expensive ingredients that can be used to make sushi that is equally delicious!

Of course, buying in bulk is also a great way to save money on sushi ingredients. Japanese sushi rice is generally sold in bulk quantities, so this can help you save as well. Once you make the rice, you can even freeze it in a plastic bag to save to use another time; it will stay fresh in the freezer. This will also help you save time later on if you are in a rush to cook! Sushi rice is usually inexpensive when bought in bulk; however, quinoa can also be used as a substitute ingredient if you can find some that’s less expensive at a local grocery! It is a little harder to roll because it does not have quite the same sticky texture as sushi rice, but with a little extra care, it certainly can be done!

Somewhat like the Japanese immigrants did when they substituted avocado for salmon, we’ll be substituting sweet potato for any seafood. This ingredient has a somewhat similar texture, but sweet potatoes cost a lot less than fish, which certainly helps on a student budget. In addition to sweet potato, this recipe will use shiitake mushrooms. Most of the time, when this sushi is made it is seasoned with scallions; however, finely cut, cooked onions can be used as well. The sweet potato should also be cooked, then cut into thin strips.

Take a sheet of seaweed, then fold and tear off a two-inch strip. Spread a layer of rice (or quinoa) over the large sheet of seaweed, but remember to leave a border on the top and bottom edges. Fold the bottom edge of seaweed up over the rice layer, and lay the seaweed strip down. Line the sweet potato, shiitake mushrooms, and sliced onions on the seaweed, and bring the whole layer down to the edge of the bamboo mat. Roll the sushi together, cut into eighths, and enjoy!


This is the ninth chapter from an e-book by one of the Campus Clipper’s former publishing interns, who wrote about how to make sushi. Follow our blog for more chapters from this e-book. We have the most talented interns ever and we’re so proud of them! For over 20 years, the Campus Clipper has been offering awesome student discounts in NYC,  from the East Side to Greenwich Village. Along with inspiration, the company offers students a special coupon booklet and the Official Student Guide, which encourage them to discover new places in the city and save money on food, clothing and services.  

At the Campus Clipper, not only do we help our interns learn new skills, make money, and create wonderful e-books, we give them a platform to teach others. Check our website for more student savings and watch our YouTube video showing off some of New York City’s finest students during the Welcome Week of 2015.

Become a fan on Facebook and follow us on Twitter and Instagram

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Make Your Own Sushi: Sushi on a Picnic

Saturday, March 18th, 2017
Image Credit: https://elitefood.wordpress.com/tag/sushi/

Image Credit: https://elitefood.wordpress.com/tag/sushi/

When most people think of a picnic lunch, the first thing on their minds is not sushi. However, there are a lot of summer vegetables that make for delicious sushi ingredients, and since sushi is generally a small but filling meal, it’s easy to carry with you. This recipe will use ingredients that won’t spoil and are summery and delicious. If you’re still doubtful that your sushi will be fresh, though, you can always pack an icepack along with your sushi lunch!

For this recipe, we’ll be using green beans, zucchini, and dried shiitake mushrooms. There are plenty of other mushrooms that are delicious in the summertime, though, so feel free to substitute another type if you want a fresher sushi. Green beans and zucchini are great in the summer, and especially if you grow your own––green beans are super easy to take care of! These ingredients make a great and light summer meal that’s also filling.

As always, fold and tear a two inch strip off the seaweed. Spread a thinner layer of rice than usual over the seaweed, while leaving a border on both the top and bottom edges. This will make it a lighter meal; few people want a heavy meal in their stomachs during a hot summer! Cut your ingredients into strips—the zucchini in particular should be cooked first; the green beans can be left raw for an added crunch. Fold the bottom edge of seaweed on top of the rice layer, lay the seaweed strip down, then line up your ingredients along the piece of seaweed. Bring the whole layer down to the edge of the bamboo mat, and roll the sushi together. Cut into eighths, and pack in a lunchbox. For a nice snack, cherry tomatoes and snap peas will go along well with your healthy picnic lunch!


This is the eighth chapter from an e-book by one of the Campus Clipper’s former publishing interns, who wrote about how to make sushi. Follow our blog for more chapters from this e-book. We have the most talented interns ever and we’re so proud of them! For over 20 years, the Campus Clipper has been offering awesome student discounts in NYC,  from the East Side to Greenwich Village. Along with inspiration, the company offers students a special coupon booklet and the Official Student Guide, which encourage them to discover new places in the city and save money on food, clothing and services.  

At the Campus Clipper, not only do we help our interns learn new skills, make money, and create wonderful e-books, we give them a platform to teach others. Check our website for more student savings and watch our YouTube video showing off some of New York City’s finest students during the Welcome Week of 2015.

Become a fan on Facebook and follow us on Twitter and Instagram

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Make Your Own Sushi: Study Break Sushi

Saturday, March 11th, 2017
Image Credit: http://www.rawtillwhenever.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/09/vegan-tempura-sushi-2.png

Image Credit: http://www.rawtillwhenever.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/09/vegan-tempura-sushi-2.png

Generally, when I’ve been stuck in the library for a while, and I finally take a study break, it’s spent watching stupid youtube videos while eating junk food from the vending machine. Although that makes for an easy snack break, junk food is not such a great idea. After all, there are plenty of foods that are good for your mind and memory, and there’s no better time for a stimulating snack than on a study break! Several of these “brain foods” make for a great sushi recipe, so the next time you need a snack while you’re studying, try it out!

For this recipe we’ll be using brown rice and sushi rice mixed together, along with broccoli, eggplant, and asparagus. Brown rice provides vitamin B6, which has been linked to memory, cognition and brain health. Broccoli, too, has B6, as well as vitamin K, which is known to improve the health of brain cells. Eggplant contains nasunin, an antioxidant that is said to protect the lipids in brain cell membranes that maintain your brain’s health; and asparagus is a good source of folate, which is good for your brain and even reduces the risk of dementia later in life.

To start, fold and tear a two inch strip off the seaweed. Spread a layer of rice over the seaweed, while leaving a border on both the top and bottom edges. Fold the bottom edge of seaweed on top of the rice layer, lay the seaweed strip down, and line your ingredients up. Bring the whole layer down to the edge of the bamboo mat, and roll the sushi together. Cut into eighths, and enjoy!

For a drink that goes well with your study sushi, rather than having a soda, try some matcha green tea on the side! It’s delicious, and it has antioxidants and vitamins that are also good for your brain!


This is the seventh chapter from an e-book by one of the Campus Clipper’s former publishing interns, who wrote about how to make sushi. Follow our blog for more chapters from this e-book. We have the most talented interns ever and we’re so proud of them! For over 20 years, the Campus Clipper has been offering awesome student discounts in NYC,  from the East Side to Greenwich Village. Along with inspiration, the company offers students a special coupon booklet and the Official Student Guide, which encourage them to discover new places in the city and save money on food, clothing and services.  

At the Campus Clipper, not only do we help our interns learn new skills, make money, and create wonderful e-books, we give them a platform to teach others. Check our website for more student savings and watch our YouTube video showing off some of New York City’s finest students during the Welcome Week of 2015.

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Make Your Own Sushi: Sushi for Vegetarians and Vegans

Saturday, March 4th, 2017
vegetarian-sushi-rolls.jpg.839x0_q71_crop-scale

Image Credit: https://www.fromthegrapevine.com/israeli-kitchen/recipes/vegetarian-sushi

Sushi is one of the easiest meals to adapt for vegetarian eaters, mainly because when you make it yourself, all ingredient choices are up to you, and sushi is tremendously variable with regard to ingredients. This recipe includes egg—if you’re vegan simply leave it out—as well as dried shiitake mushrooms and spinach leaves. For vegetarians and vegans who need to watch their protein intake (since animal products are an important source of protein), this recipe makes sure to use ingredients that have plenty of protein. Nori seaweed, shiitake mushrooms, and brown rice are good sources of protein; the mushroom also provides dietary fiber and iron. It’s a good idea to use half brown rice and half Japanese sushi rice, so that the rice stays sticky enough to roll easily.

The egg in this sushi is cooked like an omelet, but sweetened. Take an egg and beat it in a bowl––beating the egg thoroughly will help make sure the color is even. Add a pinch of salt and about ¼ teaspoon of sugar, and cook it in a pan, making sure to keep it as flat as possible. When it’s cooked, fold it and cut into strips. Cut the dried shiitake mushrooms into strips as well.

Once all your ingredients are prepared, fold and tear a two-inch strip off the sheet of seaweed. Now cover the seaweed with rice, leaving a border of about an inch on top and a half inch below. Fold the bottom border on top of the rice, and lay the seaweed strip on top of the rice. Line up your ingredients on the seaweed, and bring the whole layer to the edge of your bamboo mat. Hold the bamboo mat and seaweed with your thumb and forefinger, and, keeping the ingredients in place with the rest of your fingers, fold the seaweed and bamboo mat over the ingredients. Unroll the bamboo mat, bring the seaweed to the edge of the mat once more, and roll the sushi all together. Now simply cut the sushi into pieces about an inch long.

A great side dish to go with this sushi is miso soup with tofu. Tofu is a great source of protein, so this soup is the perfect side for anyone worried about protein intake!


This is the sixth chapter from an e-book by one of the Campus Clipper’s former publishing interns, who wrote about how to make sushi. Follow our blog for more chapters from this e-book. We have the most talented interns ever and we’re so proud of them! For over 20 years, the Campus Clipper has been offering awesome student discounts in NYC,  from the East Side to Greenwich Village. Along with inspiration, the company offers students a special coupon booklet and the Official Student Guide, which encourage them to discover new places in the city and save money on food, clothing and services.  

At the Campus Clipper, not only do we help our interns learn new skills, make money, and create wonderful e-books, we give them a platform to teach others. Check our website for more student savings and watch our YouTube video showing off some of New York City’s finest students during the Welcome Week of 2015.

Become a fan on Facebook and follow us on Twitter and Instagram

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Make Your Own Sushi: Sushi for the Health-Conscious

Saturday, February 25th, 2017
Image Credit: https://www.finedininglovers.com/recipes/appetizer/quinoa-sushi-rolls-salmon/

Image Credit: https://www.finedininglovers.com/recipes/appetizer/quinoa-sushi-rolls-salmon/

Sushi can be a very healthy meal. It’s simple; it’s not processed, and it’s packed with nutrients. Amie Valpone– culinary marketing consultant, nutritionist and author of www.TheHealthyApple.com– emphasizes the importance of clean eating like this for your health. When you eat sushi, you get plenty of nutrients without any unhealthy processing, or heavy butter and cream, making it a great choice for your body! Although we already did a salmon recipe, salmon is one of the healthiest kinds of fish to eat, and a classic sushi ingredient. This time, we’ll pair the salmon with broccoli and asparagus, for a simple and healthy sushi.

Many of the ingredients often found in sushi are incredibly healthy. Nori seaweed in particular has great health benefits; of all of the types of seaweed, it is one of the richest in protein and fiber. It also contains omega-3 fatty acids, as well as vitamin C and taurine, which can help your body maintain a healthy cholesterol level.

Take a sheet of seaweed, fold, and then tear off a strip of about two inches. Spread the rice over the sheet of seaweed, leaving a border of about an inch on top and a half-inch below. If you like, you can mix brown rice with the Japanese sushi rice. Brown rice is an important source of whole grains and minerals, and can even help protect against heart disease and type two diabetes. Mixing the two types of rice will give you the health benefits of the brown rice while staying sticky enough to roll easily. Fold the bottom border on top of the rice.

Now it’s time to line up the ingredients. Wild salmon in particular is full of nutrients and minerals such as selenium and omega-3 fatty acids, with low mercury content. Broccoli, in addition to being high in fiber, also contains plenty of vitamin C and folic acid. Asparagus is also a good source of folic acid, but it also provides almost an entire alphabet of vitamins––vitamins A, C, E, K, and even B6. Now bring the seaweed and rice layer to the edge of the bamboo mat, and begin to fold it over the ingredients. Once it’s folded, use a knife to cut with back and forth sawing motions, again to keep the sushi’s round shape.

Enjoy!


This is the fifth chapter from an e-book by one of the Campus Clipper’s former publishing interns, who wrote about how to make sushi. Follow our blog for more chapters from this e-book. We have the most talented interns ever and we’re so proud of them! For over 20 years, the Campus Clipper has been offering awesome student discounts in NYC,  from the East Side to Greenwich Village. Along with inspiration, the company offers students a special coupon booklet and the Official Student Guide, which encourage them to discover new places in the city and save money on food, clothing and services.  

At the Campus Clipper, not only do we help our interns learn new skills, make money, and create wonderful e-books, we give them a platform to teach others. Check our website for more student savings and watch our YouTube video showing off some of New York City’s finest students during the Welcome Week of 2015.

Become a fan on Facebook and follow us on Twitter and Instagram

Share