Archive for the ‘Housing spaces’ Category

How To Lose a Roommate in 4 Months

Wednesday, July 5th, 2017

College roommates are tricky, especially in New York where space is limited, buildings are old, and once you’re off campus you’re living in a real world environment with real adults. As I approach 2 years in New York, I look back on all 4 of my roommates and wonder where it went wrong and where it went right.

 

1. Rooms Don’t Clean Themselves

As cool as it would be to sing a little tune and watch the cockroaches scattered about your apartment team up to tidy up à la Enchanted, this has yet to happen to me and boy have I tried. Freshman year, the cleaning in my suite was wistful thinking. Piles of dishes in the sink and beyond sported food remnants caked on like it had grown there. The stench was rivaled only by the trash, which filled every empty trash-looking container we had. A pile of unclaimed broken glass lasted over a week in a corner. The K-Mart Brand Swiffer was the only thing not dirty, it stood untouched next to the kitchen as a woeful reminder. I don’t really blame our suite of six girls – we were busier than ever, more independent than ever, and I guess more content to live in filth than I ever will be again. Early on we all claimed ourselves as clean people and concluded that there was no further need to discuss how we were going to keep each other honest and it spiraled from there. So my advice to you? Set up expectations and a cleaning schedule. Go buy cleaning supplies before you need them. And though we all have that laundry chair, just make sure there isn’t rotting food under all those clothes.

 

2. Talk in Person

The digital age makes communication much more accessible, but when it come to the person sleeping in the same room as you, it’s best to address things about your shared living space in your shared living space. Sure the occasional “Can you make sure my straightener is off?” isn’t going to do you any harm. But when you are sitting 12 feet from each other all afternoon, you shouldn’t receive a text about how they would prefer if you didn’t have people over on Wednesdays 2 minutes after you walk out the door. As someone who spent a semester living with that person, I would find myself falling into a trap of replying to these long texts about things that made her uncomfortable instead of bringing it up face to face. Learning to stand up for yourself or addressing a situation in person can be hard, but it’s always the best route to go. Otherwise, four months into living with someone you’ll get a text as you walk out the door saying that this living situation is no longer working for them, and you never see them again.

 

3. You Deserve Your Space Too

Maybe you’ve been graced with the perfect roommate whose schedule and friends fit perfectly with yours. I was not that lucky. One of my roommates was so adamant about never having people over to our apartment that on the occasional Saturday I did, she’d shut herself in her room despite my attempts to be friendly and socialize. There’s a difference between being a good roommate and a huge pushover. As much as I wanted to respect her space, I also felt I deserved to hang out in my own apartment every once in a while. Of course, there are times where it’s okay to request space from your roommate and all their friends, as long as this isn’t 100% of the time. It would have been unrealistic for me to be paying for an apartment that I was never in because my roommate didn’t allow people over. Living the early 20s adult life is all about learning to compromise and respect peoples living spaces on both sides.

 

4. Make a Friend

After you’ve sorted through the kinks of living with someone, it’s important to think about how you get along as people. A roommate can be just some person you share a living space with, or they can be someone you think of as a part of your home. Despite your own busy life, don’t forget to take a moment to talk to your roommate at the end of the day or even make plans with them every once in a while. The person you’re living with can have a drastic effect on how comfortable you are in your own home, and friendly conversation can bring things to a whole different level.

 

Looking for a way to get to know your new roomie? Have a Spa Day at IL Girasole! Whether it’s mani pedis before brunch or facials before a Friday night out, with your Campus Clipper coupon and Student ID you can get 15% all the time on any of their services.

Image Credit: campusclipper.com

Image Credit: campusclipper.com

 


By Caroline Flynn

Caroline Flynn is a Sales and Publishing Intern at the Campus Clipper studying Theatre at NYU Tisch. Caroline is passionate about the arts and dedicated to using her voice to make other people smile. As she heads into her Junior year, she is excited to be writing about how relationships have shaped her life while she takes on summer in the city for the first time. Check out her Instagram for more witty and heartfelt content on her life. 

We have the most talented interns ever and we’re so proud of them! For over 20 years, the Campus Clipper has been offering awesome student discounts in NYC,  from the East Side to Greenwich Village. Along with inspiration, the company offers students a special coupon booklet and the Official Student Guide, which encourage them to discover new places in the city and save money on food, clothing and services.  

At the Campus Clipper, not only do we help our interns learn new skills, make money, and create wonderful e-books, we give them a platform to teach others. Check our website for more student savings and watch our YouTube video showing off some of New York City’s finest students during the Welcome Week of 2015. 

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How to Find an Apartment in NYC: A Guide for Students – Conclusion

Saturday, September 3rd, 2016
Image Credit: http://1000awesomethings.com/2011/12/05/99-getting-the-keys-to-your-first-apartment/

Image Credit: http://1000awesomethings.com/2011/12/05/99-getting-the-keys-to-your-first-apartment/

At the end of the day, just remember that despite the stress, heartache, and bumps in the road that you will likely encounter, things are going to work out. You’re not the first person to search for an apartment, even though it may feel that way. I won’t lie to you, finding the apartment of your dreams may not be the most realistic thing right now, though it is a nice goal to have. At this point, your apartment hunting should be viewed as a learning experience that will help you long after you move out. And by going into the search with some information, you’ll feel better about the experience.

 Good luck, and happy hunting!

By Alex Agahigian


Alex Agahigian was one of the Campus Clipper’s publishing interns, who wrote an e-book on how to find an apartment in NYC. This was the last chapter of her e-book. Follow our blog for more chapters from various students’ e-books. We have the most talented interns ever! For over 20 years, the Campus Clipper has been offering awesome student discounts in NYC,  from the East Side to Greenwich Village. Along with inspiration, the company offers students a special coupon booklet and the Official Student Guide, which encourage them to discover new places in the city and save money on food, clothing and services.  

At the Campus Clipper, not only do we help our interns learn new skills, make money, and create wonderful e-books, we give them a platform to teach others. Check our website for more student savings and watch our YouTube video showing off some of New York City’s finest students during last year’s Welcome Week.

Become a fan on Facebook and follow us on Twitter and Instagram!

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How to Find an Apartment in NYC: A Guide for Students – Emergencies

Saturday, August 27th, 2016
Image Credit: http://www.lockaroundtheclock.com.au/locked-out/

Image Credit: http://www.lockaroundtheclock.com.au/locked-out/

Once you’ve moved in, you need to be aware that you no longer have an R.A. on your floor. You probably won’t have a doorman either. And there probably isn’t a mailroom or package center, so you’ll be the person signing for incoming packages. In certain situations, there are fool-proof ways to ensure you never have a problem. Don’t lose keys or get locked out by giving someone who doesn’t live in your building an extra set. That way, in an emergency you can reach them and don’t have to pay for a locksmith.

While dorms have R.A.s you can speak to when there are building issues or problems with your neighbors, the reality of apartment living is that you are essentially on your own. If there is a problem, you will have to speak with the people you’re living with. Sometimes, to avoid this issue, you can leave a note in your hallway. But the best thing to do is probably knock on the offender’s door. You’re not going to get peace and quiet 24/7, but if it’s been multiple weekdays of 3am parties, it doesn’t hurt to remind your neighbors that you are a student, and you would greatly appreciate their understanding that while you don’t mind parties, you do need some sleep. If you don’t get the response you want, talk to your landlord or other neighbors, and see if there is anything that can be done.

 If something in your apartment breaks, such as your toilet or stove, call your super. It’s his responsibility to take care of repairs, as long as the appliances broke down for reasons not directly related to you. Always remember that you’re renting the space, so, when you leave, everything needs to be in the same condition you found it in. There will be minor wear and tear, but there shouldn’t be a myriad of issues when you leave, or you’ll risk losing your security deposit.

By Alex Agahigian


Alex Agahigian was one of the Campus Clipper’s talented publishing interns, who wrote an e-book on how to find an apartment in NYC. Follow our blog to read more chapters from Alex’s e-book and use her advice to make your own apartment-hunting more fun and easy. For over 20 years, the Campus Clipper has been offering awesome student discounts in NYC,  from the East Side to Greenwich Village. Along with inspiration, the company offers students a special coupon booklet and the Official Student Guide, which encourage them to discover new places in the city and save money on food, clothing and services.  

At the Campus Clipper, not only do we help our interns learn new skills, make money, and create wonderful ebooks, we give them a platform to teach others. Follow each new blog post to read a chapter of our various books and to learn how the Campus Clipper can help you follow your dreams!

Stay tuned for more tips from Alex on apartment hunting, check our website for more student savings and watch our YouTube video showing off some of New York City’s finest students during last year’s Welcome Week.

Become a fan on Facebook and follow us on Twitter and Instagram!

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How to Find an Apartment in NYC: A Guide for Students – Landlord / Lease

Monday, August 22nd, 2016
Image Credit:  http://blog.easyroommate.com/responsibilities-landlord/

Image Credit:
http://blog.easyroommate.com/responsibilities-landlord/

While you shouldn’t be suspicious of everyone in New York, you need to be on your guard around your landlord. One of the most common issues with landlords is that they find reasons to not give you your security deposit back. In order to ensure this doesn’t happen to you, and no long legal battle ensues, demand a walk-thru and a walk-out when you move into the apartment and exit. If your landlord doesn’t want to do this, request the super does it with you instead. Take plenty of pictures of the floors, the appliances, and the walls as you’re moving in. If there are any major problems with the apartment, bring them to the attention of your super and landlord as soon as possible. You may think some scratches on the floor or a dent in a door isn’t a big deal, but your landlord may attempt to hold onto part of your security deposit, claiming there was damage done. If you take extra steps in the beginning, you won’t have to deal with a larger problem later.

You should keep both your super’s phone number and your landlord’s number saved in your phone, especially if your super doesn’t live in the building. Additionally you should familiarize yourself with a list of tenant rights and responsibilities, which can easily be found online.

By Alex Agahigian


Alex Agahigian was one of the Campus Clipper’s talented publishing interns, who wrote an e-book on how to find an apartment in NYC. Follow our blog to read more chapters from Alex’s e-book and use her advice to make your own apartment-hunting more fun and easy. For over 20 years, the Campus Clipper has been offering awesome student discounts in NYC,  from the East Side to Greenwich Village. Along with inspiration, the company offers students a special coupon booklet and the Official Student Guide, which encourage them to discover new places in the city and save money on food, clothing and services.  

At the Campus Clipper, not only do we help our interns learn new skills, make money, and create wonderful ebooks, we give them a platform to teach others. Follow each new blog post to read a chapter of our various books and to learn how the Campus Clipper can help you follow your dreams!

Stay tuned for more tips from Alex on apartment hunting, check our website for more student savings and watch our YouTube video showing off some of New York City’s finest students during last year’s Welcome Week.

Become a fan on Facebook and follow us on Twitter and Instagram!

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How to Find an Apartment in NYC: A Guide for Students – Search

Monday, August 15th, 2016
Image Credit: http://www.fastweb.com/student-life/articles/apartment-hunting-questions

Image Credit: http://www.fastweb.com/student-life/articles/apartment-hunting-questions

I know it seems like we’ve been building up to this for a while, but the final thing you should do before you go out and search is to make a list of things you do and don’t want in an apartment. While this may sound silly, it’s easy to get overwhelmed after looking at multiple apartments, and forget what is important and what isn’t. Once you have your list, come prepared. Bring a camera, pens, notebooks, and if you can, someone besides the person you’re living with. A parent or some other mentor is always helpful because two heads are better than one. They may be able to point out something you haven’t considered. Don’t forget to ask about building amenities, such as laundry. Check the water pressure of sinks and the shower. Consider how many flights of stairs you’re willing to walk up. Take your time when you’re in the apartment, and feel things out.

While Craigslist.org has gotten a bad rap, it’s a great resource for finding apartments straight from the previous renter. But if you’re wary, there are other great resources. Your college/university usually has resources for students. There’re websites like nofeerentals.com you can use. You can also go with a broker, but, unfortunately, there are fees involved—sometimes as high as 15-20% of a year’s rent. It’s better to cut out the middle-man and find an apartment through other resources.

You should start looking 6 weeks to a month in advance. Anything prior will be tricky, as most rental apartments are trying to be turned over quickly. Schedule looking at many apartments during the course of a day, and then narrow down your choices after a few of these excursions. It’s common for the person you want to rent from to pressure you, letting you know the apartment will go off the market soon. And though the turnover rate is fast, it’s better to make sure you really like the place than feeling panicked and rushing into a decision.

By Alex Agahigian


Alex Agahigian was one of the Campus Clipper’s talented publishing interns, who wrote an e-book on how to find an apartment in NYC. Follow our blog to read more chapters from Alex’s e-book and use her advice to make your own apartment-hunting more fun and easy. For over 20 years, the Campus Clipper has been offering awesome student discounts in NYC,  from the East Side to Greenwich Village. Along with inspiration, the company offers students a special coupon booklet and the Official Student Guide, which encourage them to discover new places in the city and save money on food, clothing and services.  

At the Campus Clipper, not only do we help our interns learn new skills, make money, and create wonderful ebooks, we give them a platform to teach others. Follow each new blog post to read a chapter of our various books and to learn how the Campus Clipper can help you follow your dreams!

Stay tuned for more tips from Alex on apartment hunting, check our website for more student savings and watch our YouTube video showing off some of New York City’s finest students during last year’s Welcome Week.

Become a fan on Facebook and follow us on Twitter and Instagram!

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How to Find an Apartment in NYC: A Guide for Students – Expenses

Monday, August 8th, 2016
Image Credit: http://www.appsgalery.com/apps-by-rosi-reddy-8695

Image Credit:
http://www.appsgalery.com/apps-by-rosi-reddy-8695

If you’ve been living in a dorm or your parents’ house up until this point, you’re going to experience a new form of expenses: utility bills. It is very rare in New York City to have an apartment with utilities included (though hot water and heat must be provided by your landlord). The rates for electric bills alone are staggering, and if you engage in the behaviors you likely did pre-electric bill paying, you’re going to find yourself dealing with almost triple digit sums at the end of the month. In addition, there are no dining halls in apartments, so you’re going to have to have a food budget. And since you’ll probably be cooking, you’ll also be paying a fee for the gas that powers your stove and oven.

With this in mind, it may be helpful to make a list of all the estimated expenses, so you have a better understanding of what financial life will be like once you’re in your own apartment. And if things seem a little too extravagant, brainstorm with your parents and roommate on how to keep costs down. Remember to unplug your laptops, chargers, etc. in order to keep your electric bills reasonable. And if you know you won’t be using your stove at all, call Con Edison and tell them to turn off your gas, otherwise you’ll still be paying $10-20 a month for a service you’re not even using.

You’ll also have to decide whether to get Internet and/or cable television. Some people find cable a luxury that’s not realistic or affordable. So opting for a cell phone and Internet in lieu of a landline and cable can be a good option. Also, to help avoid food budget problems, consider going to farmer’s markets instead of the grocery store. The Union Square Greenmarket has in-season produce, which keeps costs down, and the prices are sometimes negotiable. And when going to the grocery store, bring coupons and stick to a list to avoid impulse shopping and overspending. Make delivery a treat when you’re in the middle of finals week and need a break without wasting time. And if you save going out to eat for special occasions, you’ll enjoy saving money and the occasional indulgence.

By Alex Agahigian


Speaking of saving on going out, here are some great student savings from Stuyvesant Organic with this Campus Clipper coupon:

StuyvesantOrganic

For over 20 years, the Campus Clipper has been offering awesome student discounts in NYC,  from the East Side to Greenwich Village. Along with inspiration, the company offers students a special coupon booklet and the Official Student Guide, which encourage them to discover new places in the city and save money on food, clothing and services.  

At the Campus Clipper, not only do we help our interns learn new skills, make money, and create wonderful ebooks, we give them a platform to teach others. Follow each new blog post to read a chapter of our various books and to learn how the Campus Clipper can help you follow your dreams!

Stay tuned for more tips from Alex on apartment hunting, check our website for more student savings and watch our YouTube video showing off some of New York City’s finest students during last year’s Welcome Week.

Become a fan on Facebook and follow us on Twitter and Instagram!

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How to Find an Apartment in NYC: A Guide for Students – Neighborhoods

Monday, August 1st, 2016
Image credit: https://media.timeout.com/images/102906033/225/169/image.jpg

Image credit:
https://media.timeout.com/images/ 102906033/225/169/image.jpg

When looking for an apartment, another important aspect to remember is the neighborhood you’re going to live in. This will not only help narrow down your search by limiting where you’ll be looking, but it will also give you a better idea of what you’re looking for in off-campus housing. At the top of your list of considerations should be how far your neighborhood is from your school, what kinds of public transportation is available, what amenities are in the area, and the safety of the neighborhood. You should ask yourself, will you feel comfortable walking alone in your neighborhood after dark? Will you be able to find food and household supplies easily? How far away is the bus/subway and does it run regularly?

While you may think you’re saving money by opting to live in a neighborhood that’s a little far from your school but with lower rent, remember that a monthly metro card in New York City is currently over $100. And you don’t want to live in a place that’s so far from your classes that it’s a struggle to be on-time. Narrow down your choices before you start hunting, as this will make things easier when you’re ready to look at apartments.

I would love nothing more than to list every neighborhood in the five boroughs and give you a detailed list of statistics about them all, but the truth is neighborhoods are always changing. If you try to stay completely current based on literature your head will spin. The best thing to do is talk to your friends who live in different neighborhoods and get their opinion. And be sure to visit neighborhoods yourself. Statistics offer some information, but the best information you can get will come from hands-on experience.

By Alex Agahigian


Alex Agahigian was one of the Campus Clipper’s talented publishing interns, who wrote an e-book on how to find an apartment in NYC. Follow our blog to read more chapters from Alex’s e-book and use her advice to make your own apartment-hunting more fun and easy. For over 20 years, the Campus Clipper has been offering awesome student discounts in NYC,  from the East Side to Greenwich Village. Along with inspiration, the company offers students a special coupon booklet and the Official Student Guide, which encourage them to discover new places in the city and save money on food, clothing and services.  

At the Campus Clipper, not only do we help our interns learn new skills, make money, and create wonderful ebooks, we give them a platform to teach others. Follow each new blog post to read a chapter of our various books and to learn how the Campus Clipper can help you follow your dreams!

Stay tuned for more tips from Alex on apartment hunting, check our website for more student savings and watch our YouTube video showing off some of New York City’s finest students during last year’s Welcome Week.

Become a fan on Facebook and follow us on Twitter and Instagram!

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How to Find an Apartment in NYC: A Guide for Students – Roommate (s)

Monday, July 25th, 2016
Image Credit: https://www.unh.edu/housing/living-roommate

Image Credit: https://www.unh.edu/housing/living-roommate

Deciding whether to have a roommate or to live alone should be settled on before you even begin hunting for an apartment. A very common mistake students make is thinking that moving in with a friend is a great plan that doesn’t require serious talk or consideration. Unfortunately, this isn’t the case. No matter who the candidate is, you need to sit down with your potential roommate and go over several things before making a final decision. Some important things to talk about are: the logistics of who will be paying, the neighborhoods you’re willing to live in, and your expectations about cleanliness and guests. While every little detail doesn’t have to be figured out between you and your potential roommate, you need to be clear and honest in your expectations. Once your name is on a lease, your credit is on the line. So if you aren’t firm about not wanting parties at the apartment, or ensuring your roommate has a viable job that can pay rent, you may lose your security deposit, or worse. Initial discomfort when talking about tough subjects will pave the way for an easier time farther down the road.

If living with a friend isn’t an option, then there are plenty of resources to find a roommate online. Facebook and Craigslist are two great sites. And you can also print out ads and post them around your school. Some schools even have resources that help you find roommates as part of their off-campus housing department. Just ask around and don’t worry that you’ll end up settling for a roommate who’s not a good fit. At any given time, tons of students are looking for roommates, so you’ll find your perfect match. Just give yourself time. Generally a month or two is enough notice.

Additionally, if parents are going to be involved in paying for the apartment, it might make sense for you to meet them as well. It will give you peace of mind, knowing how much financial support your roommate is getting. And if your roommate is going to be paying rent himself or herself, don’t hesitate to ask questions about her work and income. While these aren’t the easiest things to go over with a stranger or friend, minor discomfort now will prevent any miscommunications or issues when you’ve moved in and signed a yearlong lease.

By Alex Agahigian


Alex Agahigian was one of the Campus Clipper’s talented publishing interns, who wrote an e-book on how to find an apartment in NYC. Follow our blog to read more chapters from Alex’s e-book and use her advice to make your own apartment-hunting more fun and easy. For over 20 years, the Campus Clipper has been offering awesome student discounts in NYC,  from the East Side to Greenwich Village. Along with inspiration, the company offers students a special coupon booklet and the Official Student Guide, which encourage them to discover new places in the city and save money on food, clothing and services.  

At the Campus Clipper, not only do we help our interns learn new skills, make money, and create wonderful ebooks, we give them a platform to teach others. Follow each new blog post to read a chapter of our various books and to learn how the Campus Clipper can help you follow your dreams!

Stay tuned for more tips from Alex on apartment hunting, check our website for more student savings and watch our YouTube video showing off some of New York City’s finest students during last year’s Welcome Week.

Become a fan on Facebook and follow us on Twitter and Instagram!

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How to Find an Apartment in NYC: A Guide for Students – Introduction

Monday, July 18th, 2016
Image Credit: http://www.conway-homes.com/4-most-common-mistakes-when-apartment-hunting/

Image Credit: http://www.conway-homes.com/4-most-common-mistakes-when-apartment-hunting/

When one thinks of traditional college life, the universal image conjured by most people includes a bunch of students hanging out in a dorm. But dorms are expensive, and not every university can guarantee housing for all four years. Not to mention that dorms can be a breeding ground for a party atmosphere that makes studying difficult. Whatever the motivation is, many students are finding themselves opting to live in apartments and other forms of housing that aren’t affiliated with their university. Off-campus housing is now becoming a college norm.

I only spent one year living in campus housing, and my decision to rent an apartment in the city instead of staying in campus housing is one I’ve never regretted. But if I could go back and change one thing, it would be my inexperience. I went into this situation as a complete greenhorn, and through trial and error I was able to learn a lot. While no amount of advice can completely eliminate the stress of apartment hunting, I want to offer as much advice and help as I can.

So if the decision to live off-campus seems right for you, the first people you have to talk to are your parents. It’s important to know how involved they are going to be in this process. At the very least, encourage them to show their support by helping you look for an apartment. Make sure you have a clear understanding of why you want to leave the dorms, and find the best way to communicate this to your parents. Once you have an agreement worked out, it’s time to begin the process of finding an apartment in New York City.

By Alex Agahigian


Alex Agahigian was one of the Campus Clipper’s talented publishing interns, who wrote an e-book on how to find an apartment in NYC. Follow our blog to read more chapters from Alex’s e-book and use her advice to make your own apartment-hunting more fun and easy. For over 20 years, the Campus Clipper has been offering awesome student discounts in NYC,  from the East Side to Greenwich Village. Along with inspiration, the company offers students a special coupon booklet and the Official Student Guide, which encourage them to discover new places in the city and save money on food, clothing and services.  

At the Campus Clipper, not only do we help our interns learn new skills, make money, and create wonderful ebooks, we give them a platform to teach others. Follow each new blog post to read a chapter of our various books and to learn how the Campus Clipper can help you follow your dreams!

Stay tuned for more tips from Alex on apartment hunting, check our website for more student savings and watch our YouTube video showing off some of New York City’s finest students during last year’s Welcome Week.

Become a fan on Facebook and follow us on Twitter and Instagram!

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College Savings and Saving Space in Your Suitcase: What to Pack When Studying Abroad

Saturday, September 27th, 2014

When I fantasize about traveling it’s always the same: one neatly packed backpack with just the essentials. Unfortunately, I am not a light packer and so this is never the case. When it comes to studying abroad you want to make sure you’re properly prepared for whatever you may encounter on your trip. It’s never a good idea to assume that a foreign country has exactly what you’re looking for. Try to find college discounts for certain items before your trip and you can save yourself a lot of trouble once you’re there. So what if you’re labeled the “mom” of your trip? Being prepared is never a bad thing—and chances are your new friends will thank you.

Before your trip it’s important to at least attempt to learn the language of the country, or at least learn some key phrases. Rosetta Stone is a great option, but for those of us on a budget there are free smartphone apps readily available. Mindsnacks is a really helpful app I found before my trip to China that allowed me to start learning the language through a series of fun interactive games. If you upgrade to the full version for $5, you’ll get access to 1000 words and phrases, 9 unique games, and 50 lessons to master. This app is available in many different languages and the upgrade is definitely worth the money!

Mindsnacks is a free app that can be used to learn new languages.

Mindsnacks is a free app that can be used to learn new languages.

Do some research about the weather you’ll experience during the months you’ll be there and pack your clothes accordingly. You don’t want to be the one wearing sweaters in the heat or shorts in the snow. Make sure you have a solid stock of any medicines or vitamins you may take every day. Regular toiletries are an essential and it’s always handy to buy Tide-To-Go, packets of Downy or any other fabric soap just in case you need to do a wash at a moment’s notice.

downy.1load.packet.travel

tidetogopen

Sometimes laundry gets expensive in a foreign country.

 

Check to see what banks are available in the country you’re going to. Many countries often have branches that are linked with Bank of America so if you don’t have an account, open one up. It’s free and you won’t have to pay fees every time you grab some cash from the ATMs. The China Construction Bank, found all over China, doesn’t charge any fees as long as you have a BoA card. You can easily close your BoA account once returning to America.

Other important items are charger adapters for your specific country of origin. The outlets in America are not the same in every country and you do not want to be that person with the hair straightener exploding in your hair!

Also, to stay in touch with family and friends during your trip, set up a Gmail, Skype, Viber, and Whatsapp accounts. These are free ways to connect with your loved ones through email, phone calls, video and text messaging all through WiFi. You don’t want mom to get a $356 dollar phone bill because you accidentally used your data while roaming, do you?

My group connects to the WiFi in our hotel in Hong Kong and immediately engross themselves in social media.

My group connects to the WiFi in our hotel in Hong Kong and immediately engross themselves in social media.

-Sam Levitz is a graduate of Brooklyn College and went on the CUNY Study Abroad trip to China the summer of 2013. Follow her on Instagram: slevitz

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